Google Knows Where you Live and They Want to Tell Everyone

Did you know Google keeps track of everything you do online, with any Google products, software, etc. You can’t make them stop, not really. (You would have to eliminate Google from your life). Also, if you do want to control how much they know and share about you, the most you can do it pause it. There is no stopping Google.

Google is not the only option for web searches. Even if you are only looking for your own site to see where it comes up in a search – why are you only looking at Google?!

The following screen captures are a mess due to problems with software I was using. Right now I don’t want to fix them. But, they tell the story, as messy as it is.

Jenny Holzer Writes Projections as Art

Jenny Holzer is an artist presenting ideas in words for public spaces. 
The public dimension is integral to Holzer’s work. Her large-scale installations have included advertising billboards, projections on buildings and other architectural structures, and illuminated electronic displays. LED signs have become her most visible medium, although her diverse practice incorporates a wide array of media including street posters, painted signs, stone benches, paintings, photographs, sound, video, projections, the Internet, and a race car for BMW. Text-based light projections have been central to Holzer’s practice since 1996. As of 2010, her LED signs have become more sculptural. Holzer is no longer the author of her texts, and in the ensuing years, she returned to her roots by painting.
Quoted from Wikipedia.
I found her through Twitter, someone else said she was one of his favourite people to quote. My experience has been different. To me she sounds fatalistic, meaning she has lost hope and doesn’t feel anything will change for the better. 
ENJOY YOURSELF BECAUSE YOU CAN’T CHANGE ANYTHING ANYWAY
IN SOME INSTANCES IT’S BETTER TO DIE THAN TO CONTINUE
CALM IS MORE CONDUCTIVE TO CREATIVITY THAN IS ANXIETY
These are among her recent posts. The first one is current, posted today. I don’t find those inspirational and I don’t agree with them either. 
I do like some of her quotes, but these three make me worry for her. I hope she has people around to notice should she need help. 
Anyway, I posted her link and her art out of interest for the genre. I like combining art genres and styles in new and interesting ways. What would you post up on a building in lights? Something you wanted to share and inspire the world (or at least the city) with.

Ad Blocking May Change the Way the Web Works

The open web was around before advertising and SEO and the commercially focused web. The open web was not based on making a buck by turning the web into a spam pool.

If advertisers want my attention they can find a better way to get it than aggravating me to the point where I block their ads!

But, it’s so much easier for them to keep on spamming. Using sneaky, under-handed and aggressive tactics treats people like robots. No one wants unavoidable advertising, running on bloated software, forced on them over and over and over. Why do you think people go ad blind? Part desensitization and part self preservation, ad blindness keeps people from getting spam overload.

Capture

PageFair chief executive and co-founder Sean Blanchfield, said: “With ad blocking going mobile, there’s an eminent threat that the business model that has supported the open web for two decades is going to collapse.”

Source: The impact of ad blocking set to hit $41bn | The Drum

In Defense of Using Ad Blocker

I’ve been coming across more sites which ask me to turn off ad block on my web browser. Most are keeping it friendly, like this request from Guardian (asking for financial support instead of support through ad views). That’s fair enough and I do understand. However… how about changing the ads to something I don’t mind viewing.

Why do people use Ad Block?

The reason I use ad block are the video and other bloated files which automatically open when I visit a site. I don’t especially care that most of them are ads. I don’t want to be stuck with big files opening on my web browser.

I pay for my ISP, bandwidth included. Perhaps there is free , or very cheap,  unlimited Internet service in the US. I don’t have that option here in Ontario. I pay an extra $20 a month to have unlimited bandwidth. Before paying that extra I was spending between $5 and $45 per month for going over the allowed bandwidth for my account. That wasn’t friendly.

If sites ran simple text ads or (at very least) kept bandwidth heavy ads from opening automatically, I would view their ads. Until then… I’m already supporting them by spending $20 a month ($240 a year, plus 15% tax) more to my ISP. See if they can collect it from them because I’m not willing to spend more just to view advertising I have very little real interest in.

How much are you willing to spend to view advertising?

adblockuser
If you want to find ad block for your web browser take a look at the apps and addons available. For Google Chrome there are 5 which I have used at various times. I continue to use more than just one.

New Scammy Ad Sales Technique to Watch For

There is a technique in real estate (and other sales related situations) to offer a buyer in order to create a sale. The buyer is fake. In real estate the technique is used to keep sellers on the hook, hoping for a nibbling buyer. So the real estate agent keeps (or renews) the listing. The buyer then disappears.

I’ve been getting more offers to place ads on my sites again, now that I’ve been getting them active again. Some are the same old scammy things, like guest posts. A few are legitimate offers and I have accepted a couple and been paid. Others are sneakier, or is sneaky really a fair word? Maybe I should just consider them all sales pitches, even when they are deliberately misleading.

The sales pitch below came into my email this week. What do you think when you read it?

realorscam

 

I went to the site because I wasn’t sure. I do try different sites and services and then forget about most of them. So it was very possible that I did begin an account there. But, I was suspicious.

I had to get a new password sent. This wasn’t horribly surprising but it could also be a great way to get people to join a site they think they have already joined. I’ve seen other social sites pull this scam.

Then I looked at the ad they were offering. I wasn’t very interested. Also, I didn’t see a mention of payment, an actual amount or a time period the ad would run. That is a little red flag. I like set terms. Real advertisers will want set terms too.

Next, I looked at the site they wanted to run the ad on. That was when the final curtain came down for me. The link they were using was not one I would have used. (Or, very, very unlikely at least). It’s a link from my old Blogger site. The link now redirects to it’s own domain. So, if this were legitimate why would they be using that old link?

On the other hand, the description for my old Blogger site was there, along with other details which I very well could have done myself if I had set up an account on that site. Still, I really doubt I would have set up an account for an old redirct link and not any of the domains I currently use.

I’m careful. I try to be fair to the advertising services. Still, I’m not so trusting that I’m gullible (I hope). We all need to be careful. Most bloggers and online writers do not have a staff to help them keep up with scammers. We just have to do it ourselves and hope we get it right. Err on the side of caution, especially when money is involved.

Make Widgets Cater to Bloggers

A widget should provide something I want. Why would I want to give these buttons from Bloglovin space on my blog? They serve no purpose for me. I can already use WordPress functions to get email sign ups and followers (and keep the information on my own database). Unless I have a huge following on Bloglovin, I don’t need to show those numbers.

This widget really only advertisers Bloglovin. That’s fine but… my space is worth something to me. I like Bloglovin but I don’t like them enough to give them free advertising on my site.

If you design a widget you want bloggers to add to their sites – think about it from their perspective. What can you offer them? Why would they want to post your widget? What can your widget do with will give value to the blog/ blogger over time? (Why should they keep your widget?)

bloglovin widgets

Source: Widgets – Bloglovin

Social Popularity Checker

Why hasn’t anyone made a plugin like this? It would need a shortcode to place it on blog pages and posts, not just left as a sidebar widget. Great way to show advertisers your site is worth a paid ad. Likely other good applications for this too. My brain is just focused on advertising and promotions today.

socialpopularitycheckerCheck popularity of your website on different social networks

Source: Social Popularity Checker

Why didn’t Klout do this?  Popuri has something like it but not as much detail.

Buying and Selling Ads at Project Wonderful

Originally posted to HubPages, 2012.

I’ve been a member of Project Wonderful for more than 5 years.

projectwonderful1

You can begin running ads on your site/ blog without investing a cent. Publishing ads (as a publisher) is easier than starting to run ads for your own site (as an Advertiser). But, it’s interesting to create your ad campaigns and get more involved with selling ads as you get the hang of the Project Wonderful network.

If you do have any problem on the site, try the help section. But, Project Wonderful isgreat for giving real time support and feedback to anyone who contacts the site. This is one huge plus point in their favour.

This is what a Project Wonderful 125X125 Ad Looks Like on your Site

 projectwonderful2

Publishing Ads with Project Wonderful

Start by putting the code on your site. Wait for advertisers to begin picking your site to run their ads on. Then select the ads you want to run. You can investigate the ads and the products they want to sell. Just click on the ad before you accept it. I like to make sure the product being sold isn’t something I would find disagreeable. In the early years of Project Wonderful there were some spammy ads. I haven’t found that to be a problem these days.

Advertising on Project Wonderful

As an advertiser with Project Wonderful you don’t need to spend big money getting started. Ads can run for as low as one cent. You can even run your ads on sites which accept free ads.

I don’t run a lot of ads for my own sites. Most of the time I let the money I make build up and then I will run a few ads until I’ve spent about half of the money I made by just letting ads appear on my own site. In this way, Project Wonderful can be used without spending anything of your own money. If you want to spend money on running a lot of ads, of course, you can do that.

Read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Get started at Project Wonderful by clicking here and reading the FAQs on the site. If you need extra help send in a note through the site. They will give you any help you need to get started buying and selling ads on your blog or site.

Is the News Unbiased When it’s Paid For?

The New York Times announced on Thursday that it will launch a redesign of its website on Jan. 8 that will include content sponsored by advertisers, a concept known as native advertising.

via ‘New York Times’ Readies for Web Redesign on Jan. 8 With Native Ads.

For the news to run content paid by advertisers… isn’t that going backwards? How will they keep a balanced perspective and how will readers be able to trust the news when it comes from people trying to sell them stuff instead of people reporting on the facts, unbiased. Can you really trust news when it gets filtered through corporations with their own agendas?

Would findingDulcinea Like Your Blog?

Stop thinking about luring in Google. Consider the standards of another site, one that focuses on finding great content. How would your site stack up to their guidelines?

What is findingDulcinea‘s site selection process?
We evaluate Web sites on many criteria including credibility, usability, and design.

Credibility is a fundamental criterion of any site we recommend. When considering a source, we review who has prepared the content, what the site’s editorial policy is, when the page was last updated, and whether undisclosed biases or conflicts of interest may exist.

Usability is assessed by asking ourselves the following questions: Does the site communicate its purposes quickly and concisely? Is the site’s navigation conducive to finding information and returning to where you came from? Does obstructive advertising hinder navigation, or does the site make it difficult to differentiate between content and advertising? If a site has a wealth of information but it is difficult to find, the information may be less valuable to our readers.

Design  We always note whether or not a site’s design and layout, particularly the presence of advertising, will distract our users from the editorial content, and more importantly, whether or not ads are labeled as such. Some otherwise useful sites unfortunately are rife with advertising or distracting design elements, and when this is the case, we want you to know about it.

Other important factors:

Cost: We don’t shy away from recommending outstanding subscription-based sites, but we do evaluate the pros and cons of such sites by signing up for them ourselves. More often than not, we find comparable sites in many categories that do not charge a fee for use.

Accessibility: Does the site itself load easily and get updated frequently? Do the links the site provides access to function correctly? How quickly do page loads take on average? Does the site require plug-ins like Adobe FlashPlayer, JavaScript, or other add-ons that might hinder usability? Does the site make its customer service team, authors, or editors available for contact? Where applicable, is the “Help” section well indicated and useful to readers?

via FAQ / findingDulcinea.