Visualize Where you Want to Go

Do you have a clear idea of where you want to go? I can’t say I do. Sure, I have some general idea of my happy ending. Well, not even that because I’m not planning the end part of ending.

Without going that far, I don’t really have a set plan of how I want things to be by next week, or next month, or next year. I do plan. I just don’t plan on a timeline.

Some people may find this long distance planning a good thing. It just frustrates me. There are too many things I can’t predict, or be sure of. Trying to visualize ahead (more than a few hours) just falls apart.

I’m a road trip planner. I know where I intend to go along the way so I can map out a route, just don’t ask me when I will get to each destination. There will be stops along the way. There will be extra time spent in one place and less in others. I don’t want to promise to meet anyone at a set place or time, because that will change it from a road trip into a chore.

So, I can visualize where I want to go. I can’t visualize what the world around me will look like when I get there.

Without drama or self-flagellation? That just doesn’t happen for me. Chances are, that is the reason this exercise isn’t helping me.

It comes from Robert Fritz’s Path of Least Resistance, and in a nutshell, the technique is:

  1. Visualize where you want to go. In other words, what will the world around you look like when you’ve achieved what you want? Get extremely clear on this.
  2. Notice where you are now. What does the world look like as it is today? Get extremely clear on this.
  3. Without a lot of drama or self-flagellation, notice the specific differences.

The point here is not to beat yourself up about all the ways in which you don’t live up to your dreams. The point is simply to get very clear on where you are, and where you want to be.

The next step is just to figure out … what the next step is. What action, large or small, would move you in the right direction?

You can keep cycling through these steps — today, tomorrow, or quite literally for the rest of your life. Each cycle “pivots” you in a small way in the right direction. Over time, small pivots, with forward movement, add up to major changes.

From Copyblogger.

A Happy Ending Isn’t Necessarily the Best Ending

I’ve always thought that for a book to be a word-of-mouth success, the reader has to turn the last page and be motivated in that moment to tell someone, “You have to read this!” But to me, that could be just as much because it inspired cathartic, body-shaking sobs as if it left me with a feeling of joyful elation. No matter what, it has to move me in some big, exciting, unusual way—and that, in itself, makes me happy.
A happy ending can also be very moving, making you cry at the end of a book. I especially like endings which leave me feeling stunned, in a good way. Endings which make me think on about the story, where it might go from there. Or, what alternative endings it could have had if this or that little thing had just gone differently.
Overall, I like an ending that haunts me. There are very few. I can’t even put it into words, though I’ve tried to do so just for myself even. A haunting ending is sort of a hopelessness, things which can’t be changed. Tragic and yet not an entirely bad ending, or sad. An ending where something is lost. That seems the best way I can describe it.

Have you ever written the ending to a story, before even planning the beginning? How would that work? Try it.

A Happy Ending Isn’t Necessarily the Best Ending

I’ve always thought that for a book to be a word-of-mouth success, the reader has to turn the last page and be motivated in that moment to tell someone, “You have to read this!” But to me, that could be just as much because it inspired cathartic, body-shaking sobs as if it left me with a feeling of joyful elation. No matter what, it has to move me in some big, exciting, unusual way—and that, in itself, makes me happy.

Source: A Happy Ending Isn’t Necessarily the Best Ending

A happy ending can also be very moving, making you cry at the end of a book. I especially like endings which leave me feeling stunned, in a good way. Endings which make me think on about the story, where it might go from there. Or, what alternative endings it could have had if this or that little thing had just gone differently.

Overall, I like an ending that haunts me. There are very few. I can’t even put it into words, though I’ve tried to do so just for myself even. A haunting ending is sort of a hopelessness, things which can’t be changed. Tragic and yet not an entirely bad ending, or sad. An ending where something is lost. That seems the best way I can describe it.

Have you ever written the ending to a story, before even planning the beginning? How would that work? Try it.

True Love Stories Never Have Endings

truelovestories

I just watched the Veronica Mars episode where Duncan leaves with his daughter. Veronica pushing the old fortune cookie quote into her mirror was such a great ending for this episode. Sad and yet keeping the hope for more in the future.

I’m not an expert on Veronica Mars but I don’t think Veronica and Duncan do get together again. Not so far anyway.

As a writer… what would you say is the most romantic quote for missed love? Has a romantic quote meant something to you personally? Post it in the comments.

Quotes from a Soap Opera

I laughed at a line spoken by David Vickers. I don’t know if I have it typed exactly, I tried to be quick while it was circulating around in my head. Then I picked up a few more when I tried to find the first quote, to see if anyone else had picked it up and had it the same way I did.

“I’ve been conducting a survey in my own head and there apparently, I’m legendary.” – David Vickers, from the One Life to Live soap opera, talking about his Ninja skills and intelligence.

Todd Manning: “Must be nice living in a world of newspapers; all your people in black and white. ”

Sad that All My Children and One Life to Live are ending. I began watching both of them sometime after Another World was cancelled. I had watched Another World with my Mother and Grandmother over years and years. It was very hard when Another World was cancelled, about the same time my Grandmother died. Anyway, now I’ve gotten attached to All My Children and One Life to Live. I’ve got favourite characters. I’d like to see them go on an on and eventually get old. Now I won’t. There is some talk about the shows getting another chance online. But, no guarantee that will happen or, that we will be able to see it in Canada. Already the online videos for past shows only work if you are watching from the US.

My little redheaded sister is getting married today. I should be getting ready, deciding what I am going to wear… but I’d really like to crawl back into bed and nap awhile instead. I hope I can nap in the car on the ride out there. (I’m not driving).

Best Twitter Profile of the Month…

I clicked on Grumblelina in a feed on another Twitter account. I thought it was a clever take off on Thumbelina. I could only read part of the profile at that point so I had more of a laugh when I got to her profile and read the whole thing. It probably seemed funnier because of that. But, I like the clever tacked on ending.

What’s in your Twitter profile? Could you write something with a surprise ending? A Twitter profile with a short twist of sarcasm?

My favourite Twitter bio/ profile so far… was DPopTart. I also posted about writing your own Twitter profile.

How Does the Story End?

Do you know how your story will end? 

From K.M. Weiland keeper of the Writing Question of the Day, #WQOTD on Twitter.

I answered: Not really. I have a general idea but I like the surprise ending when I get to it.

I do think you need some room to make changes as you write, not just for the ending but all the way through. You never know what some element of your own real life will bring to the story you are writing.  Something that happens in your day can bring a change to the story you write, even just your feelings about the story. So you need to pull it together later on, to smooth out rough edges, little things you forgot, etc. If you force yourself to stick to the original ending you might be robbing yourself of something better than pulls together your experience as you wrote it all.

Write About What Squicks You

Think of something you really do fear, something that squicks you every time. Create a concept for a horror movie around it. Have a villain that would scare people when they see it in a movie poster for your movie. Give your movie idea a beginning, middle and then decide on what kind of ending it will have. Will it trail off and leave a question of more to follow? Will it end well, a happily ever after or does it end badly, leaving no hope?

Knives, sharp things and cutting of skin squick me. I don’t know why, but I feel a shudder inside when I see people playing with sharp things or a TV show where surgery is demonstrated. I’d make my horror about a knife throwing act in a circus, or a couple who perform as magicians for parties. Something happens and they realize they can’t trust each other. Or, the hand of the knife thrower isn’t as steady as it once was when they were younger. Something that changes the original situation and makes every throw of the knife a risk. My ending would be something blunt and final. The movie poster would show the knife thrower as the villian, his eyes focused ahead of him and his hand ready to throw a knife but with sweat on his brow, making him seem determined and not very caring about making a mis-throw.

Stuck for a Post Idea, Tag Yourself

I used to edit my tags and even then think I was ending up with far too many useless tags which I would only end up using once and then look silly for having so many tags with so little content. I’ve changed my mind.

All those tags (and now I regret deleting so many before now) are pointers, giving me new direction when I need something to post about and feel I have no clue where to start. Not that I often find myself in this situation as I also keep an idea file where I stash news articles, pages ripped from magazines and another digital file for anything online).

Anyway, if you need an idea for a post go through all the tags on your blog. Use them to see ideas you posted a little about and could post more about now. Maybe you’ve since found new information, formed different opinions or come up with a new angle on the same topic. The options are kind of endless, once you find a direction to head into.

Happy tag surfing!