How to Behave Like a True Princess

princessOriginally written for HubPages sometime in 2013. What does the idea of being a princess mean to you? Have you written about a princess (in a fantasy world or the modern world) before?

If you want to be treated like a Princess begin by acting like a Princess with poise, grace and pleasant manners.

The word Princess comes with so many labels, from a spoiled brat to a graceful lady. Assuming the Princess you want to be isn’t the spoiled brat, how do you become the lovely fairytale Princess admired by so many?

A real Princess isn’t a dainty little thing. She stands on her own feet and makes the world (or at least her own local world) a better place. Contribute an example of how to behave better so others will see and do the same themselves. Keep your poise, don’t get flustered or impatient too easily. Use your best manners and be polite – treat others as you wish to be treated yourself.

Still, a Princess is not a doormat. She stands a little above, on her pedestal. Not so high that she can’t join in and be apart of everything going on in her kingdom but still, she holds herself to high standards and she is proud of what she is and what she does.

Don’t rest on your laurels or think you know all you need to know. Take lessons in etiquette manners and ballroom dancing too.

A Princess with some education can make a career out of being a Princess. Become an etiquette consultant, a protocol specialist or even someone working with the Embassy of your own country or in a foreign country (if you enjoy the travel).

How to be a True Princess (or at Least Feel Like One)

  • Decide on your kingdom. Your room, home, or your neighbourhood?
  • Who are your subjects? Your friends and family?
  • Communicate well. Don’t speak too quickly and use a smooth, calm tone of voice.
  • Dress like a Princess. Be proud to look pretty and elegant.
  • Resist buying cheap, wait until you can buy quality clothing, furniture and accessories rather than finding yourself with something which doesn’t suit you.
  • Wear nightgowns to bed so you can sleep like a Princess too.
  • Design your bedroom, your most personal space, to be your Princess oasis.
  • Find an especially beautiful mirror which lets you see your whole Princess self: a refined, classy woman.
  • Enjoy flowers, even if they are artificial, they will brighten up your space.
  • Take care of your hygiene, keep cleaned, trimmed and well groomed.
  • Work hard, do your best to set a good example and show how wonderful a Princess can be.
  • Work to keep a good attitude, be happy and your kingdom and subjects will be happy too.
  • Keep your standards high when it comes to your own decorum and good behaviour.
  • Keep your mind open, be tolerant of other opinions, view points and ideas.
  • Be generous with your time and energy – give to charity when you can and volunteer to help.
  • A Princess attends functions, dances and balls. Make sure you are out to see movies, go ice skating and other events you enjoy.
  • Practice good posture, standing straight and tall with your shoulders slightly back.
  • Practice making an entrance and exit, not just from the room but vehicles too.
  • Practice how you sit. A Princess keeps her knees and feet together, especially when she’s wearing a skirt.
  • Walk with a light step rather than clumping around or dragging your feet.
  • Don’t hold onto negative things and emotions for too long.
  • Do things that make you happy, follow your bliss as they say.
  • Love yourself. Be kind to yourself.
  • Be grateful for what you have and thank people who help you. Show appreciation.
  • Create your own Princess crown (or tiara).
  • Learn how to gracefully curtsy.
  • Experiment and develop a Princess laugh.
  • Learn how to give a royal wave when you are on parade.
  • Host a Royal Event to show off your beautiful gown, your crown and your graciousness.
  • Read fairy tales. Write and draw your own story about your kingdom.
  • Be kind and generous to others and be true to yourself.
  • Have a fancy tea party and invite friends and other Princesses too.
  • Smile, bestow your smile generously for your subjects and others, even those who are not in your kingdom.
  • A Princess can be excited, exuberant even, but she does it graciously and with poise.
  • A Princess is never a poor loser or a gloating winner.
  • Sometimes being a Princess is all in the details: watch your fingernails for dirt and make sure your shoes are not scuffed.
  • Princesses respect the Earth. Don’t litter.

Be a classy Princess, never become snobby or act as if you’re better than everyone else. Don’t expect special favours but be thankful when you get them.

How to Curtsy

Begin by respectfully lowering your head.

Hold your skirt out sideways just enough to give you room to bend your knees.

Slowly lift your right foot and place it behind your left foot.

With one foot forward, and your upper body straight, bend your knees. Lower your eyes.

Rise up smoothly and slowly.

Princess Links

How to Write a Babysitting Resume

How to Start your own Babysitting Business and Write a Babysitting Resume

Babysitting is a good way to make some extra money and help out a family in your community too. Babysitters can be young people or anyone with some experience who has time in the evening, on weekends and so on.

You don’t need to be a big brother or sister to get some experience as a babysitter. Ask at the school and local library, those are places where you can volunteer and pick up experience helping with children. You can spend an hour reading to younger children at school or library or any other place you find out about yourself.

It will help if you have some first aid training but it is also good to mention you do have adult back up if you run into a problem (if you aren’t already an adult yourself).

Start the resume with an introduction to yourself. Give your name, age, address, how long you have lived in the area and who your references are. These would not be part of a standard resume but this is not standard. You are applying to look after someone’s children so you put the first concerns they would have at the top of your resume. A young person could mention the school they are attending and a sentence about future plans. (If you turn out to be a good babysitter they will like to know how long you are going to be available in the area, or whether you will be moving on to university in the next year). Don’t forget contact information: phone number and email address.

List your qualifications.  Do you have first aid training, have you taken lifeguard training at the local pool, did you take a babysitting course, do you have younger brothers and sisters you have taken care of, have you looked after babies (infants or toddlers), have you been babysitting for other families, are you in any groups like Brownies or Girl Guides, have you volunteered for community events and projects where you may have helped set things up or done the clean up. Take a little time to think about things you have done. Even working within the community at events is a good thing, whether or not there were children involved.

List work experience, if you have it. This is also good because parents will need to know your schedule, when you are available. If you have had a regular schedule for a job in the past (or currently) you can show your reliability.

List your special skills or limitations. What ages of children can you look after? If you have experience with infants, say so. If you can’t babysit past midnight, let people know on your resume. Are you allergic to animals, then you won’t be too eager to babysit at a house with a lot of dogs, cats, birds, etc. If you can cook, then you could mention being able to make dinner and clean up afterwards. Can you help children with their homework? Do you have something fun you like to do with the kids in between dinner and bedtime? Are you able to transport children (if needed), on the bus, or in your own vehicle with child seats?

What do you need when you babysit? You may want to do homework once the kids are put to bed, so you need a place to work. You could also mention pets here, especially if you have allergies or asthma or are just uncomfortable with pets or exotic pets like a rat. If there food for making a snack for the children or yourself later in the evening? Will you need a ride home at the end of the job? How much advance notice do you need?

What are your babysitting rates? Include any extra you charge for later evenings, holidays, etc.

End the resume with a summary. Sum up the best assets you have written about above and give your contact information again.

How to Survive Alone in a New Town or City

Why don’t more people travel alone?

I never thought of it as being especially brave. I enjoyed being able to choose my destination each day and push myself along into meeting people, trying new things and just plain getting out there and discovering new things every day.

It’s probably easier for younger people, those who don’t stop to think about what might happen. Most of the time, all those worries are based on very little real information. Seldom did any of those worries ever become fact.

Getting lost is something I don’t even count as a problem. It’s when you do get lost that you find something really wonderful. It may be a tourist thing, a new restaurant, an attraction or an event. Sometimes the thing you discover is yourself, your own resilience, ingenuity and ability to adapt and change.

Get out there, get involved and find your way around – those are the keys I have found to living or travelling in a new place, town or city.

Getting Started by Getting Out There

The number one thing to do in a new town or city is NOT staying indoors, shut away and safe. Jump in and join in. The purpose of travel is to see new things, meet new people and broaden your horizons. Also, to enjoy yourself and relax. But, if you just stay safe inside a hotel or a safe little area you could just have stayed home and saved your money.

Start slow and build your way up, feel your way around. I often went out for breakfast somewhere. Look for a local place rather than going for a chain restaurant just like the chain restaurant you see in your own city or town. Talk to the waitress or waiter, whoever takes your order and serves the meal. Make conversation by asking them about the town, what do they recommend?

You don’t have to take any suggestions, unless something does perk your interest. The point is to find out what local people think would be good to see. Often the local people have never explored the tourist elements themselves, they just know there is a local museum or art gallery but have never taken the time to see it. Locals tend to take their own town for granted that way. If you think about it, you like do the same in your own town.

Get Involved with the Local Community

Check for event listings in the local newspaper. See how many events and group meetings (clubs and societies) you can find and attend.

Go to local shops, stores and restaurants rather than big, well-known stores and retail chains. Local places will have local people and know more about local things you can do and get involved with.

Local places will also sometimes have flyers, business cards and other media which will help you find more local things to get involved with.

Navigation in a New Place

Get local maps and learn the roads. When you plan to go somewhere study the route so you will begin to understand the streets and be able to navigate around without needing a map eventually.

Know the local transit system. Know how much bus fare costs and the general route.

Keep the phone number for the local taxi service in cause you wander too far and don’t like where you end up. You don’t even need a ride all the way back, just get dropped off somewhere you would rather be.

Don’t Fear for Your Life

Don’t be afraid to wander around on your own. Even in the “big city” you don’t have to be intimidated or afraid. Too often I hear people from smaller towns claim bigger towns and cities are dangerous, so much crime, so many guns and robberies… Of course there are more crimes in an area with more people to create them. This does not mean you are not safe.

There are more areas more places as well as more people. Actually, having lived in both big cities, small cities, small towns, villages and one town too small to have more than one traffic light – I can say you are equally safe in any of those places.

Of course, there are precautions you can take, things not to do and situations to avoid. This is regardless of your location – village, town or city.

Don’t become an easy target. Going out drinking and then stumbling around drunk is not the smartest plan. Being an ignorant loud-mouth is bound to make you less friends and give people a reason to feel resentment and anger towards you. So, mind your manners.

When you go out, have a plan. Know where you are going. Have a plan for getting there and back. This way you won’t be vulnerable if something happens and you need to leave or get back to an area you know better. Also, people who walk as if they have a purpose and a planned destination are less likely to be approached.

If people tell you are area is not good for whatever reasons, avoid that area. You can be in a small town and discover an area which is run down and usually badly kept with people who don’t have much and may be risky. This is not just a big city thing.

A Few Links

History and Culture Enthusiast Wanted

Another interesting job for a writer (though this isn’t a paying job) is someone who works for a paranormal society. What would that job description read like? Read on to find out.

Our team is currently seeking one or more individuals who have a passionate interest or background in historical & genealogical research. Those wishing to express interest in this position are required to have access to historical archives, libraries, as well as an in-depth knowledge of Atlantic Canadian History & Culture. If selected, applicants will have the option of helping with field research; however, this is not a requirement of the position.

Those interested in the position are expected to have read and understood our mission statement and related information, most of which can be found here: http://www.maritimeparanormal.ca/about-2/. As well, applicants should be aware that we are a not-for-profit organization; all members contribute on a volunteer basis and there is no monetary compensation for this position.

Successful applicants will be expected to demonstrate strong critical thinking skills, historical accuracy, objectivity, as well as a professional demeanor. Bilingualism is considered an asset but is not required.

Duties:

  • Researching & preparing information pertaining to land records or deeds
  • Researching & preparing information pertaining to historical events
  • Researching & preparing obscure, forgotten, or “dark” history
  • Genealogical Research
  • Cold calling historians, archives, and museums
  • Compiling paranormal claims, stories, and folklore
  • Producing related content for our website

If you have previously contacted us about becoming a member of our team, your application is still on file and will be considered. Please feel free to send another email if you’d like to add any information that specifically relates to the above position.

Please forward all applications to: justin@maritimeparanormal.ca

Thanks for your interest!

via Maritime Paranormal™ ~ East Coast Canada ~ | Nova Scotia | New Brunswick | PEI |.

Basic Blogging for Women: How Artists Can Use Blogs

Looking through these sites, I would say that some ways for artists to use blogs are:

* To discuss the creative process.

* To share their daily life with their fans.

* To create an online art piece

* To advertise events where they will be appearing

* To market and sell new work.

* To create an online community

via Basic Blogging for Women: How Artists Can Use Blogs.

Quotes for Writers from Seven Steps on the Writer’s Path 2

They can’t yank a novelist like they can a pitcher. A novelist has to go the full nine, even if it kills him. – Ernest Hemingway

The perfect journey is circular – the joy of departure and the joy of return. – Dino Basili

The medals don’t mean anything and the glory doesn’t last. It’s all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing. – Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else. – George Halas Continue reading Quotes for Writers from Seven Steps on the Writer’s Path 2

Ladies Learning Code

We’re a women-run not-for-profit group working to empower everyone to feel comfortable learning beginner-friendly technical skills in a social, collaborative way.

Ladies Learning Code started in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in June 2011 – with a tweet. It is through the hard work and dedication of many people (many, many more than are pictured here) that we bring to the Toronto community our take on monthly workshops and other events.

We are:

  • marketers
  • developers
  • designers
  • project managers
  • business development managers
  • research technicians
  • marketing managers
  • digital strategists
  • community managers
  • consultants

Ladies Learning Code (llcodedotcom) on Twitter.

Dear Diary: Inspiration for Journal Writers

Journaling Saves – Inspiring prompts and creative guidance to jump-start your journaling.

What inspires you to journal, write something personal about your life? People tend to write about the bigger events in their lives. But, when you actually read your old journal entries, the best are those written about an ordinary kind of day. Or a catch up entry which helps you remember everything that was happening at that time in your life. Things you had long forgotten but remember all over again with that little reminder.

What is an Online Editorial Assistant?

This is an actual job post for an Online Editorial Assistant:

The ideal candidate will have consumer writing and web experience, as well as a background or educated interest in interior design. A post-secondary education is also required. Experience with a content management system (CMS) such as Drupal, WordPress, Joomla or Moveable Type are also assets. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel, Word and Power Point for Mac computers is a must. The online editorial assistant will report directly to the Online Director, and liaise with the web team, iPad, Sales, Video and Creative Services Team and other departments of House & Home Media.

Job Responsibilities

  • Research and write photo galleries, articles, blogs and other online content
  • Reception relief duties
  • Assist with research and production for iPad issues
  • Contribute to online promotional materials as needed
  • Assist with content creation and uploads for digital partners and initiatives
  • Conduct photo research and crop images
  • Assist with updating the online editorial calendar
  • Contribute to online forums and social media communities
  • Monitor site traffic, content performance and user experience
  • Grab screenshots for results reports
  • Review press releases/product info directed to houseandhome.com and, on occasion, attend/blog about events
  • Develop content ideas and opportunities
  • Other tasks as instructed by Online Director.