Blogger Auto Poster did not Work

This one did not work. Set up was not right some how. But, not a loss because I do have Open Live Writer which does work to post to all my Blogger Blogspot sites. Not an auto poster, but I can build a post, keep it in draft and then publish it to Blogger without opening another window to the Blogger blog/ site.

Do you do anything with old (or current) Blogger blogs?


Source: Blogger auto poster – Home

Blog This! – I’m Not Giving up on Blogger

blogthisBlog This! – Chrome Web Store.

Although it feels like no one from Google is behind the wheel at Blogger these days. I still love Blogger. I’d like to use it but it’s not easy. Blogger is under developed and fairly ignored.

I think it began with WordPress snobbery.

There was a time when people either used Blogger or WordPress. A lot of people were using Blogger. It was simple, basic and you didn’t need to know a lot about HTML, scripts, plugins or themes. If you wanted to – you could work with extra code, themes and add-ons for Blogger too. But, ideally it was for people who wanted a site up without the hurdles of doing it all themselves.

You would think that would be ideal for most people. It was, for a time. Then came along the WordPress snobs. People who thought Blogger wasn’t good enough because WordPress let you do more and was gaining in community support with even more extras, gadgets and gizmos.

Blogger fell behind. It could have kept going, in second place but still strong… only Google put it on a back burner and didn’t keep developing it. There was a very big update with adding new themes, flexibility with themes and a lot more layout options. But, that was years ago.

I noticed a new post about using Blogger with your own domain, making it easier. But, that doesn’t give people a reason to use Blogger. It needs updates, new community and fresh ideas.

Please almighty Google, don’t let Blogger die!

Where Can You Still Find Blogger User Support

I will update this list as I find more resources.
powered by blogger

Good but Not Updated in Awhile

My Earliest Blog Post Date: April, 5th, 1998 (So Far)

blogaversary

Found this on the Wayback Machine today. I know I had other sites on Blogspot, Geocities, Tripod, Xoom, Angelfire and possibly other free hosting services but this is the oldest I have been able to track down so far. Nice to have the actual date. Glad I typed it in way back then. It seems much more important to me now than I would have thought then.

I know there was an older site on GeoCities. I began it when there were still communities and neighbourhoods. Wish I could remember the link for that one so I try finding it too.

Also, I deleted older sties on Blogspot and now I don’t remember what they would have been called either. One which I did happen to find has since been used by at least two other people. Which is only odd because Blogger/ Blogspot has said deleted sites would not be available for use again. But, it was thewriter.blogspot.com – it would have been in demand.

How to Reach Beyond HubPages

Note: This was originally posted to HubPages, February 2012. I’m no longer writing at HubPages but the advice to people who write for network sites is still true and worth knowing. 

To my fellow HubPages writers,

I’ve been writing with HubPages for a few months. I had joined years ago, but I wasn’t writing Hub posts until recently.

My writing experience online comes from other sites, other writing networks and my own sites which I create, maintain and promote. I have moderated forums, email lists and newsletters. I have guest posted and I have accepted guest posts. I have begun working as a content curator. In the past I have been a web directory editor for The Open Directory Project and a less well known directory, BOTW. I have written for known and unknown sites like LockerGnome, Suite101, BackWash, have any Hub writers heard of these? Chances are you have not.

HubPages has become it’s own little microcosm, it’s own little closed in and sheltered world. The traffic here is mainly from inside the network or Google. This is not really a good thing.

Google is like a bird, picking at bits of food in a huge log on the forest floor. The Google bird just snips up one snack at a time. It doesn’t dive in and find more or tell anyone else to come and see what great snacks there are in this tree. Everything Google finds becomes part of its database and someone has to search for it in order to find you. In Google, your content is just a little bug waiting for another bird to dig for it, with the right words.

There are so many other sources for traffic! Most Hub writers are not using Twitter, for instance. Twitter is simple to use. It would also let Hub writers talk outside of HubPages which is a good thing because it promotes HubPages – outside of HubPages. Twitter is only a beginning… StumbleUponTumblrPinterest, Snip.it, Flickr… Are these foreign lands to you? Then it’s time to set your eye on the horizon and explore them.

You can promote your Hub posts in so many fresh, new places. Places you will enjoy exploring, places you will find new ideas to write about, meet new people with your interests and interesting sidelines to your interests.

Start your own blog on WordPress.com or Blogspot. It’s free in those places. Link to your Hubpages account, post links to your latest Hub article and invite discussion. Yes, you want people to comment on your Hub, but they have to get there first. Post the best Hub comments on your blog, as a way to lure readers from the blog onto your Hub post where they can add to that discussion. However, don’t use your blog or any social media as just a way to promote your HubPages account. That is a slippery slope.

It takes time to use social media or a blog well. They should never be used as just a feed for your Hub content. Why would someone read a carbon copy? Have original content, things you don’t post at HubPages. Post ideas you find and may write about. Post updates to old Hubs you have written and, of course, link back to the original Hub content. Post about a bad day, post about your new achievements and goals you are setting for yourself.

Each place you land in, establish a presence in, will bring you new readers and give HubPages new life outside of itself. This will bring traffic from outside of HubPages, those places where most people have never heard of HubPages or think it’s not worth visiting. Reach out there and change their minds.

My Hub Traffic Comes From…

hubtraffic

I like to see where my traffic came from, more than the actual numbers. This is my Hub traffic. Image captured mid day, January 20th.

I don’t know if there are rules about posting traffic stats on HubPages. I don’t mind to share mine, to show my work.

My Hub traffic reaches out past Google. I get traffic from my own blog where I have added a link to my HubPages account right along with my Twitter, StumbleUpon and etc. accounts. I put in time on Scoop.it, content curating for topics which relate to the Hubs I write. While I do link to my own posts there, I also link to some of yours on HubPages and other sites.

On my blog you will see a wider variety of traffic sources. Some of these come from comments I have left on other sites and blogs. Some are networks I have joined. I also exchange links with other bloggers, web writers and friends online. I even get a little traffic from a writer’s network which is now abandoned by the owner.

So you can get traffic from a lot of places, even those which aren’t especially active. The key is in the focus of the site, especially in the case of a small or inactive site. People wind up there, with the focus of whatever the topic or niche is. If they find your link, chances are you will get clicked on because they came looking for your kind of content.

My Blog Traffic Comes From…

blogtraffic

This is taken from my main blog, Word Grrls. Also, mid day, January 20th.

 

Who is the Big Winner in a Web Battle?

Forgotten Movable TypeThe end of Google Reader and the rush of new Feedly accounts has caused people to declare Feedly a “big winner” in the battle for picking up the sudden slack now that Google is closing Google Reader.

I think it is early to call Feedly a big winner. For one thing, it is not so hard to get a lot of new accounts when the tide turns suddenly. Keeping them is another issue. How will Feedly manage the load on their servers? Not so well that first several hours. I began setting up an account and could not complete the process. Is my half done account one of those they have counted as a new member? Likely. How many others are accounted for mistakenly this way?

Beyond that, will Feedly keep it’s new accounts with new features, will they adapt what they have for what the Google Reader crowd will be expecting? People seldom want change, even when they make a change they really want everything to be about the same. The Google Feedlies won’t want to learn how to use a new site, with different software, different buttons to mash.

Anyway, what I really got thinking about is how small this little battle is compared to past web service/ software battles.

RIP NetscapeThe first which comes to my mind  is the browser wars between Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator. At the time MSIExplorer won. Even now you could be kind and say MSIExplorer is still the winner. But, it would be a kindness. At this time Microsoft’s Internet Explorer is the web browser which has to be coddled along when it comes to web design and development. Code has to be added for it, like bottle feeding an over grown baby. Poor Netscape is gone. You may find an old version, unsupported and dusty. Isn’t there some quote about the heros of the past or the underdogs?

The other big battle was the one between the ruling blog software (not counting Blogger/ Blogspot, this was a war between the stand alones, the blogs for people who bought domains and learned how to write code, or at least manipulate and customize it).

In the beginning Ben and Mena Trott had Movable Type as the most popular, undisputed champion of the blogging world. If you had a blog, on a domain, you were most likely, proudly running Movable Type. Then, along came an upstart, WordPress. At first WordPress wasn’t even an underdog, it was just some little pretender to the throne. Movable Type was king, who needed anything else? Then… Movable Type made a change… just one change… they asked people to pay for what had been free. The utopia toppled, there were grumbling rebels and when the rubble and smoke cleared WordPress (and Matt Mullenweg) were sitting on the throne. Movable Type hung on, there were many who kept their old versions afloat, stubbornly refusing to be disloyal. But, in the end, a blog software is only as good as the community support behind it.

Now, Movable Type is a relic, still standing in some far off place, unknown to anyone but old timers. WordPress was the big winner, in that case there was a big winner. I couldn’t say the same for the battle of the web browsers. Neither of them have ended on top. Firefox and Google Chrome have a friendly rivalry, not a war, not a battle, but not quite a friendship.

What do you think were the biggest wars for turf online? There have been a lot of them, even for the people who haven’t been online for the long haul. Which one or two web battle comes to your mind and what did it change for you?

Crossposting a Thing of the Past?

LiveJournal was taken down by DDOS in 2006.

WordPress › Live+Press « WordPress Plugins.

People jump and scurry so much for Google ratings I doubt the old crossposting plan will hold on much longer. (Unless you can just crosspost a link, without the content).

It was nice to be able to share across the waves when you had a few blogs, a few social media sites and so on. Now, Google has let it be known that duplicate content is bad, a bad thing. Not to be tolerated – and so mote it be.

That won’t be a good thing for sites like LiveJournal, Tumblr and other microblog sort of things. Not everyone wants to support a microglog in addition to their main sites, where they put in most of their time with maintenance, promotion, artistic and content creation. It will be the small blog sites that starve first. The people there tend to have other blogs or just be dabbling their fingers into the pond and not last a long time. The accounts on LiveJournal, Google’s own Blogger/ Blogspot have loads of abandoned accounts like skeletons in the closet.

Crossposting may have caused duplicate content… but was that really such a bad thing?

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Blogger Denies Access

Is anyone else getting weird login errors from their Blogger/ Blogspot accounts? I keep getting told I don’t have access and need to change accounts. But… I only have one account I use for my Blogger account. Kind of a stupid error.

I’ve only got one blog still on Blogger (this one used to be there). But I do update it now and then. So I don’t have an abandoned account.

Maybe it’s about the new thing with the domain changes for locations. Will see if they fix the problem.

Comment Scam

I’m glad we can edit comments left on the blog. I don’t remember being able to do that when I was using Blogger/ Blogspot. You could delete the comment or keep it.

Today I had a comment on an older post. It was a good post, in my own opinion. The commenter used my name and referred to the post, closely enough that it could be related to the topic or generic, depending on how you read it. I thought it was a sincere comment. I even posted it. Then I went to look at it on the post itself, outside of the editing screen.

That is when I noticed the period at the end of the last sentence contained a link to an acne treatment site. A hidden link. The funny thing is, I would have posted it (with the link even) if the link had been in the usual place rather than trying to make it a scam by hiding it. There was no link with the commenter’s name.

Anyway, I did not delete the comment. But I did go back and edit the link out. I decided to keep the comment. I will watch for other scam being made to look like a sincere comment.

The Women of Blogger

I wrote a post (Women of WordPress) with links to women involved with WordPress. After I posted it I thought I shouldn’t overlook (Google) Blogger and the women who work with Blogger.

From those making templates, writing guides for other users and generally promoting the Blogger community. Here is my list of the women who develop, create and promote Blogger/ Blogspot. Some I have had in my own bookmarks and others I found as I went looking for them.

If you know of a Blogger woman not on this list please let me know so I can update the list.

After spending time looking at resources for Blogger users I am surprised at how little there is still out there. Even the Google Blogger Buzz blog is kind of slow. I did find a Blogger Help Forum and Blogger on Twitter.

Mainly for my own interest, here is what I found of sites not created by Google. The Blogger community seems to be shrinking and has shrunk a lot in just a couple of years. Yet the software is still being used.

There are endless sites offering Blogger templates/ themes. Most are a bit disappointing, they are outdated or they really only give you a background image, not a template. I won’t list those, not today anyway. Never know what I may do now that it’s all on my mind. Poor Blogger. I’m really under whelmed by the content online for Blogger users.