I Want a Vintage/ Antique Library Cart

First, you should know, they are far more expensive than you would expect. (I was surprised). A new cart is also very expensive, plus there will be some assembly required with almost all of them. I can do the assembly, but… I’d still rather have an old cart assembled by someone else long ago. I don’t mind some wear, authentic wear, not contrived to look worn and aged. Fake aging is too artificial. Besides, wouldn’t an old cart be much happier cleaned up and given a fresh coat of paint? I don’t want a sad cart.

librarycart1

This one was on a site from the UK. Even pricier but I really like the look of it.

 

librarycart2

This one was found by someone else and done over. I would rather have it painted a nice showy red – make it look glamorous.

I found a few vintage/ antique carts online. Most are too expensive once you consider the shipping and the dollar difference from anything in the US. Paying double the asking price just doesn’t seem fair. Even when they say free shipping, that doesn’t mean they will stick to it when it comes to me.

So, I will continue to poke around on the Internet from time to time and see what I find.

librarycart3

The best bargain I could find online for a new book cart was from Wayfair. The company is new to Canada (or at least new to me in Canada). They offer free shipping and likely it is free shipping when it originates here. But, why is the price so much different just over the colour? I like the plain silver better than the white or black. I just think it’s odd. It’s not an old cart though, so no history to it. Likely I’d have to put the wheels on, if not more assembly. So… it is tempting. I’ve begun trying to let go some of my books and the cart would help in sorting them. Plus, I could keep it for the books I use most often and whatever I have on hand in fiction to be read.

Donate Your Books to Prisons (in Canada)

Canadian resources/ organizations which send books (fiction and non-fiction in good condition, no hardcovers) to prisons/ inmates in Canada.

You can find out more from the post on PEN Canada – Prisoners’ Right to Read. There is also a mailing label you can print out to go along with any  books you send. Note – books can not be sent directly to an inmate, but publishers, libraries and organizations (see above) can do so.

Of course you can’t send any book, on any topic or anything which describes criminal activity. However, you can send books which will help inmates learn (or improve) their reading skills. You can also send non-fiction. Think about all those gardening, cooking, history and science books which you haven’t looked at in years.

Thank Your Readers

Dear Reader,

If you find elegance, or anything of value in the following tale, it will be something you brought in with you. No need to be kind, this story is like an overfed Canada goose lumbering along, unable to get enough lift to fly, deciding to lump through winter, taking handouts from nature loving city dwellers. Thank you for reading and bringing something of value to an old, fat goose.

I remember books in which the writer addresses the reader, like a narrator taking them along through the story. I don’t know (or remember) the literary name for this. For whatever reason the above Dear Reader was in my brain as I woke up this morning.

What would you write to your own Reader? What style or tone works for you?

Imagine the Long, Lost Journal Found

What does a journal look like? If you found the long, lost journal of long dead explorer, what would you expect it to look like? I see it as leather, beat up, dark cover and dirty, weather beaten held together with string or something else found along the way. What if it were the journal of a dentist? That I’d expect to be pristine, white and not at all dog-earred. What does your own journal look like, if you keep one?

Pick someone: scientist, teacher, fashion designer, etc and write about the journal they keep. What does it look like? How does it reflect the writer? Describe the wear and tear and any extra things like art added to the cover or a lock to hold in all those secrets. Where is the journal kept? Or, has it been lost? Give the journal a whole story of it’s own (before you even open the pages).journal

Journal from: Canada Beauty Supply

My own journal has evolved to a lined page notebook with a flowery cover. No security like a lock or elastic to hold it closed. I don’t keep it in any special place, nor do I hide it away. But, that’s my life now. I used to keep it in my desk drawer. These days my desk is a computer desk and it didn’t come with drawers. Besides, it seems wrong to keep a journal in a desk drawer unless the desk is old and made from wood.

The Canadian Book Challenge

9th Canadian Book Challenge Logo flag

The Canadian Book Challenge is an annual online reading challenge in which participants from Canada and around the world aim to read and review 13 or more Canadian books in a one year span: Canada Day to Canada Day. Reviews must be posted online and participants are asked to share links to their reviews with other participants. More on reviews below.(It’s also a lot of fun and collectively we’ve read and reviewed thousands of Canadian titles! Actually, the whole books, not just the titles.)

Source: The Book Mine Set: The 9th Canadian Book Challenge

For those who aren’t Canadian, do you read books by regional authors? When did you last try someone local?

Why is Canadian English unique?

Why is Canadian English neither US or UK English? Even the Canadian language version of WordPress seems to be just a modified UK English – it gets Canadian English wrong.

Canadians understand not being included in many versions of languages but… it does seem sloppy to create a Canadian version as if we spell words the same as people in the UK. We don’t.

BBC – Culture – Why is Canadian English unique?

BBC – Culture – Why is Canadian English unique?.

Get in the Road Trip Mood

Find a vintage motel or hotel postcard on eBay. Pick something from your local area so you will know the streets, more or less. Use Google Street View (find the location on the back view of the postcard) see if you can find the motel now. Is it still there at all? If so, is the name the same? Spot the differences between then and now.


Source: Caribou Motel Barrie Orilla Ontario ON Canada Vintage Chrome Postcard | eBay

Take it on the road and visit the site. Get a photograph and (if you have a site) post the then and now images. Find some history, if you can. Or design a history for the motel yourself. Who owned and operated it over the years? Did they love it, grow too tired to keep it going, run out of money? What changes happened around them in the local area?

I found the Caribou Motel in the present, it’s gone. Replaced by a new gas bar. Nothing left of the old motel and diner except the space around the new building. You can see some curb out by the road and the parking lot is bigger than the current commercial business would need. Small hints at what once was.

caribounow

You can see what became of the Caribou in urban exploration photos from CopySix and other explorers who posted to Flickr and Ontario Abandoned Places. Note: the CopySix post has a comment from the original owner’s family.

Writing Prompts for Food Bloggers

Check the link to read the full list. The list included your foodie history, diets, ingredients, kitchen gadgets, where you would have dinner if you could choose from anywhere in the world and what makes a memorable meal. Of course, food loves and hates make the list too.

I liked the prompt about ingredients you’ve been afraid to try. There are so many interesting, exotic and unusual ingredients these days. I can remember when my Grandmother was afraid to cook corn on the cob. She had never seen it before (in the UK) and ended up leaving it to rot before she worked up the courage to cook it. I always thought that was silly when I was a kid. But, corn was pretty commonplace to me. I’ve since had a few things expire in my own fridge.

How do you feel about the word foodie?

Write down 10 of your favourite food words, and then make a sentence for each word. Turn each sentence into a blog post idea.

via 16 Writing Prompts for Food Bloggers | Food Bloggers of Canada.

 

I think it’s a great list. Many of the prompts could be adapted for other topics if you put some creativity into it.