Inspiration from Horror and Science Fiction Genres

This list comes from Writers Digest.

I’m still looking for more science fiction subgenres so this list isn’t enough for me. But, it is a good place to start. Also great as inspiration when you get stuck for ideas or have ideas and can’t pin them down.

Horror

  • Child in Peril: involving the abduction and/or persecution of a child.
  • Comic Horror: horror stories that either spoof horror conventions or that mix the gore with dark humor.
  • Creepy Kids: horror tale in which children – often under the influence of dark forces – begin to turn against the adults.
  • Dark Fantasy: a horror story with supernatural and fantasy elements.
  • Dark Mystery/Noir: inspired by hardboiled detective tales, set in an urban underworld of crime and moral ambiguity.
  • Erotic Vampire: a horror tale making the newly trendy link between sexuality and vampires, but with more emphasis on graphic description and violence.
  • Fabulist: derived from “fable,” an ancient tradition in which objects, animals or forces of nature are anthropomorphized in order to deliver a moral lesson.
  • Gothic: a traditional form depicting the encroachment of the Middle Ages upon the 18th century Enlightenment, filled with images of decay and ruin, and episodes of imprisonment and persecution.
  • Hauntings: a classic form centering on possession by ghosts, demons or poltergeists, particularly of some sort of structure.
  • Historical: horror tales set in a specific and recognizable period of history.
  • Magical Realism: a genre inspired by Latin-American authors, in which extraordinary forces or creatures pop into otherwise normal, real-life settings.
  • Psychological: a story based on the disturbed human psyche, often exploring insane, altered realities and featuring a human monster with horrific, but not supernatural, aspects.
  • Quiet Horror: subtly written horror that uses atmosphere and mood, rather than graphic description, to create fear and suspense.
  • Religious: horror that makes use of religious icons and mythology, especially the angels and demons derived from Dante’s Inferno and Milton’s Paradise Lost.
  • Science-Fiction Horror: SF with a darker, more violent twist, often revolving around alien invasions, mad scientists, or experiments gone wrong.
  • Splatter: a fairly new, extreme style of horror that cuts right to the gore.
  • Supernatural Menace: a horror tale in which the rules of normal existence don’t apply, often featuring ghosts, demons, vampires and werewolves.
  • Technology: stories featuring technology that has run amok, venturing increasingly into the expanding domain of computers, cyberspace, and genetic engineering.
  • Weird Tales: inspired by the magazine of the same name, a more traditional form featuring strange and uncanny events (Twilight Zone).
  • Young Adult: horror aimed at a teen market, often with heroes the same age, or slightly older than, the reader.
  • Zombie: tales featuring dead people who return to commit mayhem on the living.

 

Science Fiction/Fantasy

 

  • Alternate History: speculative fiction that changes the accepted account of actual historical events, often featuring a profound “what if?” premise.
  • Arthurian Fantasy: reworkings of the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.
  • Bangsian Fantasy: stories speculating on the afterlives of famous people.
  • Biopunk: a blend of film noir, Japanese anime and post-modern elements used to describe an underground, nihilistic biotech society.
  • Children’s Fantasy: a kinder, gentler style of fantasy aimed at very young readers.
  • Comic: fantasy or science fiction that spoofs the conventions of the genre, or the conventions of society.
  • Cyberpunk: stories featuring tough outsiders in a high-tech near-future where computers have produced major changes in society.
  • Dark Fantasy: tales that focus on the nightmarish underbelly of magic, venturing into the violence of horror novels.
  • Dystopian: stories that portray a bleak future world.
  • Erotic: SF or fantasy tales that focus on sexuality.
  • Game-Related Fantasy: tales with plots and characters similar to high fantasy, but based on a specific role-playing game like Dungeons and Dragons.
  • Hard Science Fiction: tales in which real present-day science is logically extrapolated to the future.
  • Heroic Fantasy: stories of war and its heroes, the fantasy equivalent of military science fiction.
  • High/Epic Fantasy: tales with an emphasis on the fate of an entire race or nation, often featuring a young “nobody” hero battling an ultimate evil.
  • Historical: speculative fiction taking place in a recognizable historical period.
  • Mundane SF: a movement that spurns fanciful conceits like warp drives, wormholes and faster-than-light travel for stories based on scientific knowledge as it actually exists.
  • Military SF: war stories that extrapolate existing military technology and tactics into the future.
  • Mystery SF: a cross-genre blend that can be either an SF tale with a central mystery or a classic whodunit with SF elements.
  • Mythic Fiction: stories inspired, or modeled on, classic myths, legends and fairy tales.
  • New Age: a category of speculative fiction that deals with occult subjects such as astrology, psychic phenomena, spiritual healing, UFOs and mysticism.
  • Post-Apocalyptic: stories of life on Earth after an apocalypse, focusing on the struggle to survive.
  • Romance: speculative fiction in which romance plays a key part.
  • Religious: centering on theological ideas, and heroes who are ruled by their religious beliefs.
  • Science Fantasy: a blend in which fantasy is supported by scientific or pseudo-scientific explanations.
  • Social SF: tales that focus on how characters react to their environments – including social satire.
  • Soft SF: tales based on the more subjective, “softer” sciences: psychology, sociology, anthropology, etc.
  • Space Opera: a traditional good guys/bad guys faceoff with lots of action and larger-than-life characters.
  • Spy-Fi: tales of espionage with SF elements, especially the use of high-tech gadgetry.
  • Steampunk: a specific type of alternate history in which characters in Victorian England have access to 20th century technology.
  • Superheroes: stories featuring characters endowed with superhuman strengths or abilities.
  • Sword and Sorcery: a classic genre often set in the medieval period, and more concerned with immediate physical threats than high or heroic fantasy.
  • Thriller SF: an SF story that takes on the classic world-at-risk, cliffhanger elements of a thriller.
  • Time-Travel: stories based on the concept of moving forward or backward in time, often delving into the existence of parallel worlds.
  • Urban Fantasy: a fantasy tale in which magical powers and characters appear in an otherwise normal modern context, similar to Latin American magical realism.
  • Vampire: variations on the classic vampire legend, recently taking on many sexual and romantic variations.
  • Wuxia: fantasy tales set within the martial arts traditions and philosophies of China.
  • Young Adult: speculative fiction aimed at a teenage audience, often featuring a hero the same age or slightly older than the reader.

Stranded on an Alien Spaceship for Life

Along on an alien spaceship, headed to the other end of the universe (an unknown) and all the time of your life ahead of you. Forget being stranded on a deserted island… what would you miss from planet Earth, stranded on an alien spaceship for the rest of your life?
stargate universeSource: Unsolved Mysteries: 15 TV Cliffhangers – Rotten Tomatoes

Stargate Universe started out so well. I wish they had kept it going (with the alien ship which seemed to have a personality and mind of its own for at least awhile). Then the show got complicated with people jumping around from Earth and back and having some mini wars… I lost the plot about mid-way. I was happy when they were trapped on the ship, learning how it worked, finding odd aliens and planets along the way.

I would watch it all again and would still like to see it continued with more stories and characters.

How to Stop Typing the Blue Alt Characters on your Keyboard

Now and then my fingers stray around on the computer keyboard and I end up clicking a few wrong buttons in a row. Most often this just gives me typos – but, now and then I get my keyboard messed up. It types the wrong characters. I can’t type things like @ or ? and other stuff comes up instead. I’m typing the characters which show up in blue on my keyboard, alternate characters, instead.

This is not something which needs to drive you crazy. The fix is simple!

press hold left ctrl+shift and tap right shift key

via How do I turn off the alternate BLUE keys on my HP keyboard – HP Support Forum – 1426059.

This works! I don’t remember how I fixed the blue character keyboard problem the last two times I’ve had it happen. But, it was something simple like this. It did not involve changing the keyboard language – but that is the tech support advice which comes up most when you search for help.

I am adding this here hoping it will help someone else. Maybe even me the next time it happens.

You are in a Halloween Horror Movie…

This came from one of my nephew’s friends on Facebook.

You are in a horror movie on Halloween, the first ten people in your chat are: (No cheating!!)

Cries like a baby:
The one who trips while running in the woods:
First to go missing:
Murdered saving you:
Survives by faking death:
Has a solid survival plan nobody listens to:
Spends all the time looking for Twinkies:
Turns into a zombie:
Everyone suspects is the killer:
Is really the killer:

Think of peopel you have read or written (characters of your own creation) where would each fit on the options provided?

TinyWeeFiction

TinyWeeFictionHow much can you put into a story of 140 characters? Take a look at TinyWeeFiction and try it out. Bonus if you can come up with a web graphic for it too. (I didn’t, the one here comes from the site for TinyWeeFiction).

I laughed at the idea of zombies. Now I’m picking up my ears and counting my fingers just like the rest of them.

I might have  a million books. If I built a fortress with books I could live in their pages forever. Send ice cream.

How does snow look so pure, clean and soft when it falls but have such a huge impact once it lands?

There are three. Can you work on some ideas for tiny fiction?

Count your characters online.

It Seems the Bookie Brunch is Over

I disovered the Bookie Brunch while writing a post about book hoarding… I mean keeping, for HubPages.

It seems to be about a year since anything new was added to the Bookie Brunch schedule. But, I liked the ideas. I would like to hear the discussions, literary, bookish and readers talking about books too.

Bookie Brunch on YouTube:

Special project, founded by Sasha Soren (‘Random Magic’). Bookie Brunch is a weekly meet-up, held every Sunday, where book bloggers can have a cup of tea and chat about a particular bookie question of interest. Pull up a chair and feel free to join us! Current series from July 2011 through December 2011. Every Sunday. Feel free to drop by and have a cup of tea and enjoy some good company. Will try to collect all Bookie Brunch videos at the channel, to make it easy to find them, and have separate, special playlist just for BB!

Questions from past Bookie Brunches:

Question: Are books better with or without love triangles?
Related topics: Do you root for a particular character in the love triangle? If so, why? What is your favorite literary love triangle?

Question: Do you prefer e-books or print copies of novels, and why?
Related topics to consider: Do you have a specific e-reader that you prefer? Why did you choose that particular e-reader, did you try any others, and what were your experiences with them?

Read more

How to Turn Off the Blue Keyboard Characters

Don’t let the blue keys drive you crazy. I some how locked my keyboard into using only the blue keys (when I wanted the standard white keyboard characters). I tried a few things but they didn’t work. I started looking online, even the HP computer site, no luck.

My other post about this and how I fixed it.

I found success on Yahoo.

Yahoo! Canada Answers – How do I turn off the blue key function on my keyboard?.

How to Write a Postcard

I’m writing a post about postcards on HubPages. I found a couple of links where someone had written about writing postcards. A nice idea. So here are a collection of tips for writing postcards.

Write about how you got there, the journey so far. Are you going by bus, driving yourself or did you fly in?

What was the first thing you did when you got into town (the city, etc.)?

Did you find a great place for coffee, a burger, breakfast..?

What are you doing right now. Literally, right at this moment?

Write about something that really stood out. A really funny, bad, silly, delicious, spontaneous event along your travels.

If you don’t want to write at all, draw something. Illustrate your adventures. Use stick figures, draw cartoon characters, or an all out great masterpiece.

Finish off with the traditional “Wish you were here” or something far more stylish and personal.

From Slouching Somewhere:

  • First, pick a postcard. Pick one that’s unexpected–from the shape to the image.
  • When you write about the place, write beyond what’s on the photo.
  • Write about the food you ate.
  • Throw a little bit of humor in it if you can.
  • Write about a place the postcard recipient knows little of. Add details.

via How to write a postcard « slouching somewhere.

The BookWord Game

From It’s All About Books, The BookWord Game.

The game has been put on hiatus. But, here is the list of all the words created up to now. What can you come up with to add to the list yourself?

A List of Bookwords
(to be added to as we create them)

RecommenDUD: A book you hate that everyone else loves.

CheckBook: A book that you find yourself checking to see how many more pages left, on every single page!

Memoread: A book that reminds you of another book you have already read, not necessarily in plot, but in tone and atmosphere.

Wait-listed: A book that continually gets moved to the ‘next in the pile’, but never gets read.

Marginally Challenged: a book with very little space between lines (likely, it’s a public domain book/classic) giving deceivingly few pages to read

Misunderbook: A book that you LOVE, but everyone else (well, almost everyone) HATES.

A Flick Pick: A book you read after you’ve seen the movie

Oblibook: A book you read because you think you should in order to be well-read.

Whoopsabooksy: A book you buy that you forgot you already read/own.

TrueFiction: A non-fiction book which reads like fiction.

Reliascribe: An author you can always count on for a good read.

Throne Tome: A good book to read in the bathroom!

Midnight Special: A book with a plot makes you unable to go to sleep.

Aroma Tome: A book with a very distinctive smell.

Screen Plagued: A book with a character that you can only picture the movie actor who played the role.

A Lullabook: A book that makes you sleepy.

A Wanderlust Novel: A book that makes you want to travel to its setting.

A Crossover Book: A book you start in one year, and finish in the next.

A Mis-covered Book: A book with a bad cover.

A Boomerang Book: A library book that gets returned unread.

Title Block: A book that you can remember its plot, but not its title.

A Book Siren: A book that begs to be read immediately.

A History Mystery: A book where characters from the present are researching characters from the past.

A Firestarter Book: A book that inspires you to do research on the topic.

Anticipage: A book where the anticipation of it is part of the excitement of the book.

A Bookmate: A person who has the same taste in books as you do.

Book Crush: A book you totally fall in love with.

Screen-plagued: A book where you can only picture the actor from the movie as the character in the book.