A Happy Ending Isn’t Necessarily the Best Ending

I’ve always thought that for a book to be a word-of-mouth success, the reader has to turn the last page and be motivated in that moment to tell someone, “You have to read this!” But to me, that could be just as much because it inspired cathartic, body-shaking sobs as if it left me with a feeling of joyful elation. No matter what, it has to move me in some big, exciting, unusual way—and that, in itself, makes me happy.

Source: A Happy Ending Isn’t Necessarily the Best Ending

A happy ending can also be very moving, making you cry at the end of a book. I especially like endings which leave me feeling stunned, in a good way. Endings which make me think on about the story, where it might go from there. Or, what alternative endings it could have had if this or that little thing had just gone differently.

Overall, I like an ending that haunts me. There are very few. I can’t even put it into words, though I’ve tried to do so just for myself even. A haunting ending is sort of a hopelessness, things which can’t be changed. Tragic and yet not an entirely bad ending, or sad. An ending where something is lost. That seems the best way I can describe it.

Have you ever written the ending to a story, before even planning the beginning? How would that work? Try it.

Sword Names – What’s Yours?

I’ve heard all kinds of sword names. I like to play RPG online and character names could just as easily be good sword names too. To pick a name for my own sword… that will take some time and consideration. Not too much of the fantasy or dramatic, I’d like a name with some sense of history. Danger too.

Maybe something with a Canadian flavour.

Source for the Idea: English Historical Fiction Authors: Sword Names – What’s in a Name? What’s Yours?

Cold Snap

Of course, ask me tomorrow and it could be something else.

When we Lose our Myths…

When we lose our myths we lose our place in the universe. ― Madeleine L’Engle

Source: When We Loose Our Myths | M o o r e z a r t

Mythology is all part of our history. The farther back in history you look the more you rely on what has been passed down from word of mouth. So much of that has become mythology. But we consider a lot of it distortions of the truth, or just fairytales. Who can really say what the truth was when there isn’t anyone to give a first hand report?

Quick Fiction Fix

I don’t remember what or why I wrote this. It’s been in a text file (unsaved) to my desktop since the weekend. The flash fiction that time forgot. How many times have you written something, finished it and then realized you had no idea why you started it?  Maybe it’s just me.

I feel asleep in front of the computer, looking up postal codes for Christmas cards. I woke up to a dark house and a darker computer screen. The power had gone out, again.

The fireplace was keeping the room warm and dimly lit. I might not have power but I had the essentials: heat, water and a roof to keep the snow from burying me. Likely there would be power again by morning.

So until then… watch a little TV… No. I laughed at myself. So dependent on electricity. Can’t even boil the water to make fresh coffee.

I got up to shut down the lights (to save power, right?). I checked the door locks. All was well. My foot was just on the first step to go upstairs to bed when the computer monitor flickered.

Without power there was nothing electrical working. I froze, puzzled. Was this some new paranormal phenomena? Some new scientific breakthrough?… Of course I had to go back to investigate.

An email was now on my screen. The rest of the computer was dark, no flickering lights showing the Internet was connected or the computer had power. In every science known to modern man it was impossible for an email to show up on my computer and yet, it was there.

No sender name or return email address. Just a note “See you tomorrow”.

I wasn’t going anywhere tomorrow. We were expecting a heavy snowstorm, it was a Sunday and my Christmas shopping could be put off for a better day. No one was coming here. I liked my weekends quiet and alone when I could get them that way.

I decided there was some yet unknown scientific principle at work, or the message was for the invisible aliens living in my house and not meant for me at all.

The First Fully Crowdsourced Science Fiction

Have you ever tried a collaborative writing project? Maybe this is something you should get into.

There have been a lot of brave and strange experiments in science fiction writing and publishing over the years—but one of the strangest is going on right now. CNet’s Eric Mack is “crowdsourcing” a science fiction novel—and you can be part of it.

Source: You Can Help Write The First Fully Crowdsourced Science Fiction Novel (Or Just Watch It Grow)

The Gilmore Girls Continues

Edward Herrmann, Lorelai’s Father, is deceased. Sookie, Melissa McCarthy, may be unavailable. But, from what I read all the other regulars will be back.

So, what will the storyline be for a Gilmore Girls catch up.

Did Rory achieve great things reporting overseas?

Did Lorelai get back together with Luke and did they break up again soon after?

How about Christopher, Emily, Gigi, April, Miss Patty, Babette, Dean, Lane, Jess, Paris, Kirk, Mrs. Kim, Gypsy, Finn and so many others!?

Before NetFlix gives us the answers… write your own.

gilmoregirls

via Netflix is reviving ‘Gilmore Girls’ – The Atlantic.

His Body was Never Found…

I started reading a post about someone else, a woman who married a man younger than herself. Later he visited Asia and…. his body was never found.

Stories like that are creepy and creepier when it isn’t fiction. Whatever happened to…

Well, what did happen to the man (or woman) in the story of your own invention? Create a character and a back story then end it with “his body was never found”. But because it’s fiction and your own story you can slip in the details, discovered via time machine far in the future, about what really did happen to poor, old…. what’s-his-name.

Image source: Theos Casimir Bernard – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Are We Losing the Art of Storytelling?

Are we too impatient to write and too impatient to read?

In our culture we want things quick, short and to the point. That doesn’t work well for fiction writers. Fiction readers may still want a book with depth, character development, rich descriptions, fully developed thoughts and a storyline. However, that takes time to write. Time to craft, plot and rewrite.

A writer gets an idea for a story. It can be written out in a few sentences, just enough for them to come back to later and flesh it out. Or, those few sentences can be shared as they are, instant gratification. The reader will have the idea, but not the story. Would they have taken the time to read it anyway?

I’ve been reading older books, written in the 1800’s. I can see a different writing style in them. Different cultures, different readers and different writers give a book the flavour of the time period it was created in. The story telling is influenced by the culture of the times.

This can work against the story, the book. Some of them are a lot of reading with old fashioned words I have to look up in the dictionary, or just ignore and assume I have the general idea. Descriptions can be endlessly long, at least they seem that way to me, reading them now. The story may wind far off track and give a lot of information which seems unimportant to me, as a modern reader of the old tale.

How will our books seem to future cultures? Even now, in our own time, how much of the richness and depth of the story are we losing?

Don’t think it’s just readers who expect a short story. How often as a writer have you cut things shorter? How often have you not had the patience to let an idea grow and evolve before posting or publishing it? We get an idea and push it out there. We rush our stories. We cut our stories down to size, not just because readers are less likely to read them, but we ourselves are less likely to write them. Move on to the next quick post, the next idea, the next project rather than let the current one take up too much time.

This was a short post. Did you read it all, or skim most of the way looking for bolded text to sum it all up?