Photocopy Art

From an original post on Suite101 by Jo Murphy. The post and Jo Murphy’s bio link are gone since Suite101 revamped the site.

Copy Art Pioneered in Canada
Centre Copie-Art Opened in Montreal in 1982 by Jacques Charbonneau

Although it was an international art movement, Canada is recognised for its major contribution to the art form called Copy Art.

According to the Encyclopaedia of Twentieth Century Photography, Copy Art or Xerography was pioneered in Canada, where it is still popular today. Copy Art, uses the photocopier to create artworks by reproducing and multiplying images. The artists play with the process of transformation of graphic images. They experiment with the metamorphosis brought about by the alchemy of light at the heart of the reproduction technology.

Origins of Copy ArtThe electrography process was developed in the USA and Germany in 1938. But this technology became freely available by the year 1960. Copy Art began to appear as an art form by about 1970, and the first exhibition of this kind of art called “Rochester” was held in 1979. Other exhibitions of this type were held in Canada in the same year.

After making its first appearance in France in 1975, copy art became more accepted. By 1983, an exhibition called “Electra” was held in the Musee d’Art de la Ville de Paris. The gallery devoted considerable space to the art form.

Copy Artist Pati HillArtist Pati Hill exhibited in the “Electra” exhibition, working with shadows, grains, and contrasts of black and white as well as textures and micro textures. To create this work, Hill created imagery from feathers, flowers fabrics and plants, says de Meridieu. In a chapter about innovative pioneers in the book called Digital and Video Art, de Mèredieu goes on to talk about Hill as a contemporary experimentalist and her work as extravagant. An example of Hill’s technique, she explains, was to photograph every possible (visible, invisible, obvious and unexpected) of the Palace of Versailles.

Centre Copie-Art of Canada

Copy Art continues to thrive in Canada today. The founder of the Canadian movement was Jacques Charbonneau. After discovering the technique, when he was on holiday, he returned to Canada where he opened Centre Copie-Art in Montreal in 1982.

Body Art and Other Offshoots of Xerography

Practitioners of body art, such as Amal Abdenour and Phillipe Boissonnet, reproduced different parts of the body using photo copiers. They were exploiting variations of colour and the effects of contrast and solarisation. Much of this work was achieved by using overlays of transparencies.

Because it so versatile, there have been many different developments and innovations that have evolved from Copy Art. According to de Mèredieu, magazines and fanzines sprang up around artist centres such as art schools and colleges. A centre recognised as famous for encouraging this type of art form was Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Dijon.

de Mèredieu points to the importance of this movement, when she mentions that Klaus Urbons founded a museum of photocopying in Mulheim an der Ruhr in Germany. Here there are displayed old machines, documentation and artist’s work. Another example of the value of the body of work, the style and the method, is the opening in 1990 of a major international museum of electrography in Cuenca in Spain.

Publishers Need Better Photography to Stay Relevant on the Web

Publishers Need Better Photography to Stay Relevant on the Web.

Most sites using images do it very casually, without putting in a lot of thought. Why would they when the image is just something they picked up to drop into the post. It has not meaning to them and often it is pretty meaningless in the post too. It’s just what you are expected to do now. Every post should have an image. That’s what the so-called gurus say.

I wish sites would go back to the day when people created their own artwork to illustrate posts. If you don’t have a professional looking photo ready for the post, draw something yourself. Why does it have to be a photo if you aren’t a professional photographer work with what you actually can do.

Draw something or get into other forms of web graphics. Turn text into art. All you need is a graphics program of some kind and the ability to type letters into it and move them around. Experiment.

Street Photography: Fashion Photography of the Ordinary

I see a lot of street photography when I look at photographs and sites that interest me. But, I never really felt they were interesting photos until today when I found the photos from Vivian Maier, vintage street photography.

Looking at those ordinary people from the 1950s was fascinating. I started with one photo and then clicked for another and another and another. Soon I had spent 20 minutes looking at street photography. I was surprised. Then I realized, street photography is like creating a snapshot of our lives, a time capsule that can be opened any day.

Without knowing the people I could see the character and the role they played in life. Seeing their background was more important than it seemed at first. The background shows other people, fashion, buildings, products for sale, and so on. Without seeing a date on the photograph you could guess when the photo was taken and where (in a general way).

I have new appreciation for modern street photography and street photographers now. We don’t have time machines so we have to record our own history as we live it.

 

Street photography gives us a look at ourselves, in our current time and (with vintage photos) our past.

Ideas for a 365 Photo Project

Ideas for a 365 photo project. – Post on HubPages.

What would your ideas be for year-long photography project? Is there one theme you could find something new to photograph each day of the year? I’ve seen a few great collections which started this way. I envy them and would like to push myself to do something too. I haven’t found the right theme yet. One I know I can stick to even if I can’t get out that day or don’t want to bother too much. Of course, you can take some photos ahead, or is that too much like cheating?

Creative Drawing

Originally posted to SuiteU, part of Suite101. SuiteU is being removed from the site. I wanted to save the ecourses so this resource would not disappear.
Drawing 101
By Joan Martine Murphy

Introduction

Most people would love to be able to draw what they see. Many people find enormous pleasure in the art of self-expression. Sadly the idea of learning to draw skillfully is quite daunting for a high percentage of people of the Western World. This is sometimes due to negative experiences that have come from early child hood.

Drawing is a form of communication, which can allow us to express ourselves when words will not suffice. This simple art form affords us the opportunity to express our emotions in a safe and pleasurable manner. Many people for example find that the simple exercise of drawing negative emotions which are then ceremoniously torn to shreds or burnt away – is a useful, safe way to deal with them. The exercise allows the artist to move on to a more relaxed and harmonious and peaceful happiness state.

Maps, symbols, colours, expressions and many other elements of design convey meaning and help us to construct a world of illusion. They help us re-present our reality. This can be useful, informative, recreational and healing.

Read more

Free Online Courses

Just a list I put together one day. Have a look if you have time to update your writing or web publishing skills.

  • WordPress
  • Google Blogger
  • Intro to Information Technology
  • Digital Photography
  • Visual and Graphic Design
  • Design – Applying Design Principles
  • Fundamentals of English Grammar
  • English Writing Skills
  • Speaking and Writing English Effectively
  • 21 Days to Building a Web Business
  • Entrepreneurship: Creating the Business
  • Diploma in Web Development
  • Diploma in Web Business Development and Marketing
  • Diploma in Social Media Marketing
  • Diploma in English Language and Literature
  • Research Writing
  • Advanced Essay Workshop

Favourite Photography Quotes

From the Boing Boing forum on Flickr come these photography quotations picked by forum readers:

“Photography…it’s the easiest medium in which to be competent. Anybody with a point-and-shoot camera can take a competent picture. But it’s the hardest medium in which to have, to express, some kind of personal vision. Because there is no touch, there is no hand, there is no physicality. The fact that you CAN have something that’s recognizable from 50 feet across the gallery as a Diane Arbus or an Irving Penn…the fact that you can have recognizable authorship means they really have done something.” ~ Chuck Close

“…to photograph is to frame, and to frame is to exclude.” – Susan Sontag

“The best camera is the one that’s with you” – Chase Jarvis

“Shoot for the secrets, develop for the surprises” – Diane Arbus

“I work from awkwardness. By that I mean I don’t like to arrange things. If I stand in front of something, instead of arranging it, I arrange myself.” Diane Arbus

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” – Robert Capa

“He will take his camera and ride off in search of new evidence that his city, even in her most drunken and disorderly and pathetic moments, is beautiful.” – William McCleery

“No place is boring, if you’ve had a good night’s sleep and have a pocket full of unexposed film.” – Robert Adams

“You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” – Ansel Adams

“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson

“Beauty can be seen in all things, seeing and composing the beauty is what separates the snapshot from the photograph.” – Matt Hardy

“Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times…I just shoot at what interests me at that moment.” – Elliott Erwitt

“Which of my photographs is my favorite? The one I’m going to take tomorrow.” – Imogen Cunningham

“You’ve got to push yourself harder. You’ve got to start looking for pictures nobody else could take. You’ve got to take the tools you have and probe deeper.” – William Albert Allard

“If I saw something in my viewfinder that looked familiar to me, I would do something to shake it up.” – Garry Winogrand

“I always thought good photos were like good jokes. If you have to explain it, it just isn’t that good.” – Anonymous

“Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop.” – Ansel Adams

“It can be a trap of the photographer to think that his or her best pictures were the ones that were hardest to get.” – Timothy Allen

Rephotography

Rephotography is the act of repeat photography of the same site, with a time lag between the two images; a “then and now” view of a particular area. Some are casual, usually taken from the same view point but without regard to season, lens coverage or framing. Some are very precise and involve a careful study of the original image. Long a technique for scientific study, especially of changing ecological systems, it became formalized as a form of photographic documentary in the middle 1970s.

via Rephotography – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Could you find an old postcard or other photograph of your town, street or some area and create a ‘then and now’ rephotograph? I think getting the position just right would be tricky and take some real patience, likely several practice shots before you could hit it just right.

Other places to find rephotography:

Flickr: Rephotography
Flickr: Now and Then
Flickr: BBC Turn Back Time
Flickr: Paris Then and Now
Flickr: Vancouver “Then and Now”
Design Observer: Views Across Time
Thomas May Photography: Then and Now
Retronaut: Rephotographing St. Petersburg
Wired: Gadget Lab: Camera Software Lets You See into the Past
Web Designer Depot: Then and Now Portrait Photography by Irina Werning
Fourmilab: The Craft of “Then and Now” Photography

Exploring with a Camera

From The Kat Eye View of the World- Exploring with a Camera.

The Exploring with a Camera series is intended to inspire you to see the world around you in a different way, using the camera as a tool to deepen your experience of life.

Why “Exploring” with a camera? Why not a “challenge” or an “assignment” like other photography blogs? I wanted to capture a sense of wonder and playfulness with this series, and “exploration” seemed to fit perfectly. Learning more about photography and your self – what you have to show the world – should be a fun experience.

I’m currently posting a new exploration every two weeks and include a link tool where you can join in and share. I also welcome suggestions and ideas for future exploration topics. Come and explore, and share your view!

Link with Love

LINKwithlove is the idea that by banding together in a “neighbourhood watch” type way – we, the internet, could teach and learn respect when dealing with intellectual property online. It is our dream that art, music, photography, words, design, ideas, etc – be shared in a way that is respectful, educated and kind.

This site is a collection of links to information, resources and communities that can help protect your intellectual property as a creator of online content. We at LINKwithlove.org encourage you to display one of our badges on your site or social network to show the world that you respect and LINKwithlove.

By teaching and supporting the proper ways to share intellectual property – we will make a difference.