WordPress Calendar Plugins

I wanted a holiday calendar. I did not find anything which really did what I wanted. (Just a simple way to keep track of holidays and all those odd international and national days for odd, but interesting and sometimes relevant, things). But, today I found a new list of reviews. Quite sure I have already looked at most of them, but there might be something new.

Chronosly looks good but it has a lot of features I don’t need and that could make it complicated to work with when I just want something simple.

I’d recommend The Events Calendar (Pro, or not) for most people who want a way to list or track events. The developers were quick to write back when I had a question when I tried the plugin earlier. It has good features and I might try it again. Last time it wasn’t quite right for me but I know it hasn’t been left to stagnate in the mean time.

Premium Calendar Plugins

  • Events Calendar Pro
  • Community Events
  • Facebook Events
  • Event Calendar WD
  • EventOn WordPress Event Calendar
  • Business Calendar – WordPress Internal Calendar
  • WordPress Pro Event Calendar
  • Sugar Event Calendar
  • StacheThemes Event Calendar

Free Calendar Plugins

  • Google Calendar Events
  • The Events Calendar
  • Chronosly Events Calendar
  • All-in-One Event Calendar
  • My Calendar

List via  wpmayor.com – Best Calendar Plugins for WordPress (2016).

Plugins to Manage WordPress Multi-Author Blogs

Note: The original post was from 2014. Likely there is a fresher list of plugins but I like to see plugins which have been around for some trial and error.

I don’t run a multi-author site (but I do write for a few). Still, in my experience, Edit Flow is excellent. I did try it myself but decided it had a lot of features I didn’t need (due to the fact that I’m the only one here). From the list, Post Forking, sounds like the one I’d try. But, it hasn’t had an update in three years.  An interesting plugin, but I decided not to try it because it’s not something I’d use very often anyway.

Maybe something on the list will be just what you need. Get the links and reviews from the post at WP Beginner below.

1. Capability Manager Enhanced
2. Co-Authors Plus
3. Restrict Author Posting
4. Revisionary
5. Simple Local Avatars
6. Author Avatars List
7. Edit Flow
8. Author Spotlight (Widget)
9. Post Forking
10. Require Featured Image
11. TinyMCE Spellcheck
12. Email Users
13. Adminimize
14. WP User Frontend
15. Moderator Role
16. Content Progress
17. Cimy User Extra Fields
18. User Submitted Posts
19. Error Notification
20. User Notes
21. Role Based Help Notes

Source: 21 Plugins to Efficiently Manage WordPress Multi-Author Blogs

Dear JetPack…

Can we have a feature to mass update JetPack’s modules for all our WP sites? I have had to reinstall JetPack due to update problems and each time my modules need to be re-set. This is time consuming and a little aggravating to do for several sites. Today 6 of them need to be reset and I can’t find any enthusiasm at all for the job. Could JetPack set this up as WP.com has made it work for updating plugins for all my blogs now?

PS- JetPack should not be on the WP.com updates. It does not work well with others there. The time before I forgot not to update it and this last time I was optimistic and thought it would work this time… But, no. JetPack has some kind of conniption each time I update it on WP.com, especially if I have other plugins to update. Why not just have JetPack update from JetPack and keep module settings there too? Please. The multi-bloggers will love you. For a few minutes at least.

I sent this request to JetPack tonight. I’m sure someone will read it but, tonight, I am still fixing/ adjusting modules cross checking between sites and wishing there was an easier way to do this.

The Forever Login with WordPress

I don’t like logging into my own WordPress sites over and over again. I really don’t like being logged out when I’ve been logged in for hours, or was just logged in a few hours ago, or yesterday. Ideally, WordPress core or JetPack, would refresh the login each time you log in. Instead it is set at every 14 days (so I’ve read).

Out of irritation with the system, I have found a list of plugins which can (I’m only picking one to try so I won’t guarantee them all) keep you logged in. Or, at least let you choose when you are logged out. Some of these plugins are geared for site users, which means anyone registered for your site.

Remember Me – The focus is on keeping the “remember me” option checked, without leaving it for users to… remember to do. There are no screenshots for this plugin and it was adopted by another developer fairly recently. So, I’m not sure this is entirely reliable or just what I want. However, it does have the most recent update.

Remember Me Controls – This is the plugin I’m going to use. It’s simple and leaves me the option to set it or leave things as they are. The plugin developer has a lot of other plugins. There is a screenshot so I know what to expect when I activate the plugin. Overall, it looks like it will work and if I do have a plugin clash or some other problem, the developer is available and seems experienced.

WordPress Persistent Login – This one I’m not sure about trying because there is no set up. Seems there should be something more to it than that. But, it does say the login will not expire at all (unless users choose to actually log out).

Older Plugins – Over one year since last updated.

configure-login-timeout – Another old plugin but this one lets you set the time period for the standard or “remember me” login.

WP Keep Me Logged In – The oldest of the plugins. Will keep you logged in for one year.

Put a Time Machine into WordPress

I like having old posts show up in my sidebar. I know about the evergreen theory where posts should never get stale, seasonal, etc. I just don’t agree with it.

I’ve been using the Time Machine plugin for several years. It sets up and works without much fuss. You can forget all about it there among your widgets.

Of course, there are other plugins for the same idea of looking back a year into your site’s life. I’ve put together a list for you to explore. (At this point the only one I can personally recommend is Time Machine).

Content Curation Works with WordPress (Free Even)

I’m using a few plugins I especially like for content curating in my WordPress sites. I had been working (and still am) with web based content curation but I would rather put all that time and content into my own sites than another. (You never know when one of those sites will make big changes, like closing down entirely). One of the projects I’m working on is to focus and sort my RSS feeds. I had over 1,000 but it is down to almost 300 now. That helps with finding content I want to post more about.

Other than testing RSS feed readers, I’ve been trying every content curation WordPress plugin I can find. Some have been trouble, some just didn’t have enough. But, one has been exceptional!

  • PressForward – A lot of features. Don’t judge by looks – this is a stand alone content curation system for WordPress. It’s also free and I have not found any problems running it several months now. In addition to the bookmarklet for nominating links you can create a post around later – you can collect feeds and read them from your own site and create posts around whatever turns up in the list. I continue to find more ways to use this plugin as I spend time working with it.
  • Link Roundups – A simple form of content curation. Created to collect links for roundup posts but you can use the bookmarklet to save links, add them to a post and do what you like from there.
  • PressThis – You can find this in WordPress. No plugin is needed. But, PressForward has additional features.

I’ve begun trying Curated Search. The features look great but I haven’t given it the test of time yet.

What have you tested and found to be great for content curation in WordPress?

Find more WordPress news and plugins: WordPress Adventures and Exploring | Scoop.it

Using Nulled Plugins and Themes

I hadn’t heard of nulled plugins and themes, as a phrase. I do sometimes look at plugins and themes beyond those offered on WordPress.org. I like shopping for plugins. I especially like trying them out and seeing if they magically make blogging easier in some way. Most don’t do what I hoped they would do. Some don’t even start once they are activated. Some give errors and won’t even load. Some load and activate but then I can’t find the plugin settings on my dashboard.

Some aren’t free.

Some plugins and themes come with a catch, hidden at times. This is what is meant about the risk in using nulled plugins or themes. You may be importing extra code to your site which is active behind the scenes. You may be advertising another site, for free. Or, you could be running a harmful code which will seem to originate from your site (and it may because you took a risk on a plugin or theme).

I will not say you should stick to the WordPress Plugin Directory 100% of the time. I don’t plan to. But, know there is a risk and don’t load up any theme or plugin without finding out how it works, what it does and what others have said about it.

It is really hard to resist when you see those premium plugins and themes available for free. The catch is that those freely available nulled premium plugins and themes are not actually free; they take your website as the payment. To put it simply, these nulled plugins and themes often contain malicious code which can do all sorts of things like redirecting users to other website(s), injecting links, creating backdoors, spamming other users, etc. In the worst case scenario, this malicious code in the nulled plugins or themes can effectively take down your website or blog.

The moral is, never use nulled plugins and themes. If you want to install a plugin or theme (be it free or premium), only download and install that plugin or theme from a reputable source like the developer’s website or WordPress repository. If you have already installed a couple of plugins or themes and want to test them for any malicious code, you can use Theme Authenticity Checker to check the plugins and themes.

Source: Make Tech Easier

Entitled to Free WordPress Plugin Support

I don’t agree with people who post, expecting WordPress plugin developers to give free support for free plugins. I know people in the community say WordPress is free and a lot of the community contributes their time to support it in forums, plugins and themes. But… the days of the free Internet are gone and WordPress is kept free because people have found ways to keep it free and available to everyone. I don’t think everyone understands this. Too many expect everything connected with WordPress should be free, freely given and supported.

This is what I wrote today in one of the plugin support forums. The post I replied to wasn’t too ranty but I don’t think it was fair. Also, consider more than feeling entitled to free help, consider the source and think about how sustainable all that will be in the long run if we don’t support the developers of WordPress core, themes and plugins as we expect them to support us.
gripingaboutwp

 

I’m not adding the link but it wouldn’t be hard to find if you felt you must. I don’t want to make this about the individual plugin or developer when it’s really about the WordPress community, all of us.

The Mystery WordPress Plugin

I like plugin shopping on WordPress. You never know what you will find. I don’t upload many of the plugins I find. I do test out several out of curiousity. But, I have to think I have at least some way to use them, in the practical sense.

When I found this one today… I didn’t understand how it could be practical. Unless it’s intended for content scrapers who want to re-word stolen content. But, that doesn’t seem likely. Not very practical for someone looking for short cuts.

Anyway, what does this plugin do? Any good guesses? I didn’t upload it to try it out on my site. It’s old and even the plugin developer had nothing more to add about it on his/ her site. unique content pluginSource: WordPress › My Unique Content « WordPress Plugins