The SeaMonkey Project is Alive

I had read SeaMonkey was retired in 2005. Mozilla wanted to focus on Firefox. But… here it is! Updated and alive as of this month (in the current year)! SeaMonkey was like the last breath of life from Netscape to the world. I hope it’s still good. It was able to do quite a lot more than the average web browser. I wonder how much of the features from the suite are still here (and working).
seamonkeySource: The SeaMonkey® Project

Making your Site Work Globally

The best way to make your site international is to have access to a translation application visible. I don’t do this myself because I keep a translator from Google in my Chrome web browser. A simple solution. People who only know one or few languages should be prepared to encounter other languages. It is then their choice to translate, run away or ignore them. Of course, it depends on how interesting and well put together the site looks, that first impression.

Trying to cater to multiculturalism, global protocols, and international readers is a good thing, in moderation. But, you can’t possibly include everyone.

Instead, identify your own location. Show where you are from and who you are. Some of your readers will be happy to find they have something in common with you (at least geographically) and others will be interested to know more about your culture, history, traditions and point of view.

The advice given with this post (link below) is mainly cosmetic. Design and colours can make your site have more international or global appeal but I don’t think keeping it neutral is really in your best interest. Boldness, drama and colour will do more for your site than becoming neutral or bland.

Source: Think Global: 3 Tips to make your websites Internationalized • Inspired Magazine

In Defense of Using Ad Blocker

I’ve been coming across more sites which ask me to turn off ad block on my web browser. Most are keeping it friendly, like this request from Guardian (asking for financial support instead of support through ad views). That’s fair enough and I do understand. However… how about changing the ads to something I don’t mind viewing.

Why do people use Ad Block?

The reason I use ad block are the video and other bloated files which automatically open when I visit a site. I don’t especially care that most of them are ads. I don’t want to be stuck with big files opening on my web browser.

I pay for my ISP, bandwidth included. Perhaps there is free , or very cheap,  unlimited Internet service in the US. I don’t have that option here in Ontario. I pay an extra $20 a month to have unlimited bandwidth. Before paying that extra I was spending between $5 and $45 per month for going over the allowed bandwidth for my account. That wasn’t friendly.

If sites ran simple text ads or (at very least) kept bandwidth heavy ads from opening automatically, I would view their ads. Until then… I’m already supporting them by spending $20 a month ($240 a year, plus 15% tax) more to my ISP. See if they can collect it from them because I’m not willing to spend more just to view advertising I have very little real interest in.

How much are you willing to spend to view advertising?

adblockuser
If you want to find ad block for your web browser take a look at the apps and addons available. For Google Chrome there are 5 which I have used at various times. I continue to use more than just one.

Google Adsense is Green!

If your Google Adsense ads are showing up green you must be using the Google Publisher Toolbar in your web browser. Just as I do.

I had this problem and could not find much about it online. There were posts in the Google Help forums but the advice did not mention just turning off the Ad overlays feature. (Maybe there wasn’t a way to turn it off then).

You will need to visit each of your sites and turn this off individually.

adoverlaysonadoverlaysoff

Gopher Proxy

Gopher was a competitor of the early World Wide Web, differing in its simpler, more structured interface. The flexibility of HTML led to the World Wide Web eclipsing Gopher, and today few people are aware that Gopher even existed. Gopher has not, however, entirely vanished, and over one hundred Gopher servers still provide access to more than a million content items. Unfortunately the number of modern web browsers with support for Gopher is dwindling, potentially rendering all of this content inaccessible.

Gopher Proxy allows Gopher content to be viewed in any web browser, by converting Gopher content into web pages as you request it. With Gopher Proxy you can browse Gopher exactly as you would browse the World Wide Web. To start, enter an address in the address bar and click on the green arrow, or enter some words in the search bar and click on the magnifying glass.

gopher proxy

via Gopher Proxy – browse Gopher content through your web browser.

It’s been a long time since I came across something using Gopher. Good that it can still be viewed/ adapted for viewing. A lot of Internet history would be found in older Gopher content.

Are you Preventing Social Sharing on Your Own Site?

 

Have you accidentally blocked social media sharing on your own site?

I tried to share a post on this site (see below) to my Scoop.it account. I was using a bookmarklet (more often called an app these days) but I could not get around this site’s note about their use of cookies. How important was this pop up note versus having a post shared?

For that matter – how important are the cookies? I block third party cookies by choice and I’m not changing that. Why is this site using third party cookies anyway?social media blocked

 

Check your own site(s). If you don’t already have a bookmarklet or app for social sharing go to the site for Chrome, Opera or Firefox (or which ever web browser you use) and take a look at the add-ons for social media. They are really nice for making social sharing quick and simple. I actually have a few of them. This way I don’t need to rely on the site itself to have social media sharing and better still, I don’t need to figure out how their social sharing works.

Firefox Isn’t in Canadian English, Yet

Dear Firefox,

Thank you for an update to the Firefox web browser. I am downloading it even as I type, actually it just finished. When I first went to the link I was offered to see the page in my language. That’s nice, I thought. Only… you skipped my language. I can understand having English (US version) and it is nice to offer English (UK or British version). What happened to English, the Canadian version? Why offer my language when it’s been skipped over?

I’m not complaining so much as just asking. Canadians, we politely protest and moderately complain. No all out war, I’m not having an 1812 about it. There’s no need to stock up on white paint and I’m not going to make cold tea in your harbours. But, you did make a point of offering my language and left me disappointed.

openlanguage

firefoxenglish

What Does Your Site Look Like to Someone Who has Blocked Video and Scripts?

Do you know what your site looks like to someone who has blocked video and scripts from starting? I came to a blog today and this is what my first impression looked like. Not very appealing, is it?
too much video

I run an addon to my Chrome web browser. It blocks video and scripts (usually ads, but not always) from starting without me choosing to click them and then let them start. I do this, first because I find a lot of ads suck up my bandwidth and run up my Internet bill. Secondly, I do it because I don’t want to see a bunch of ads. Thirdly, a site with a lot of video and scripts will be slow to load – I don’t want to wait for a site to load then read the post and discover is was not worth waiting for.

If you would like to block bloated video and ads from loading on your web browser try AdBlock Plus and take a look at Stop HTML5 Autoplay.

Simple Keyboard Shortcuts Everyone Using a Computer Should Know

I thought I should write about keyboard shortcuts. I’m surprised people don’t know them. Even simple things like using your keyboard for cut and paste functions.

Your computer mouse will work for most things you can do with the keyboard. Maybe the keyboard shortcuts will never be anything but extra knowledge or a backup plan for you… but, maybe knowing a simple keyboard shortcut will turn out to be a great thing.

Browser shortcuts save you time while you are looking at websites. Using the shortcuts on your keyboard can be simpler than right clicking the mouse, you don’t need to be as precise. Also, on sites which disable right clicks you can still use the keyboard shortcut to open new links or copy text.

These are the shortcuts I use most often. (Don’t type in the first ‘+’ it just means ‘and’ in this case).

shortcuts

Browser Shortcuts: Resources

Good Bye iGoogle Start Page

I like having a start page when I open my web browser. I’ve been using iGoogle from the start because I liked it. I didn’t really need or use much of the features. Mainly, it was a welcome each time I started up the Internet. I could check the weather, I could use the bookmarks I had created to quickly get onto whatever I was planning to do. Or, I could search for anything on Google and open a new window to check Gmail at the same time.

I will miss iGoogle, not because it was especially useful but just because it was there.

Someone has started a petition to keep iGoogle, if you want to get in on that. I won’t. It’s progress of some sort for Google I guess. But, I think they have under used the start page aspect of iGoogle and now it’s being abandoned entirely.