Writing in Spite of it All

Since the dawn of the ebook I have bought several of them, had a lot given to me for free but I’ve yet to actually read any one of them all the way through. My brother got me an ereader for Christmas (2013) but even with that I have not gotten into an ebook.

Maybe I’m just old fashioned, or just old. I like a book I can take with me everywhere, one that doesn’t need a battery to be read and can take being bashed around in my purse, under the groceries I’m carrying home in the shopping bag and so on. I think technology is going to have another big shift soon. People are going to realize they are paying for a cell phone they don’t need because texting is really just a more expensive way to send an email. This will change publishing again. I’m not sure how but I don’t think books and writing will ever be lost to us, in whatever format.

As far as having to promote and sell your own books. I don’t think this is all bad. As a web publisher I’m DIY, other than using WordPress and paying a web host, those standard things, I don’t have help. I often wish I did. But, I don’t make enough to pay anyone a living wage.

Publishing is like a doughnut. There is all the icing and cake stuff around the edges – everyone makes it seem so simple and even glamorous. But when you get into it you are alone in the doughnut hole. It’s not easy being DIY. I’ve proved that to myself endlessly. I’m not successful and I won’t be making any trips to Paris (unless I write it for myself).I got burned out two years ago and I’m on the upside of self recovery.

I can’t not write and I can’t stop feeling I have a persistent need to teach the world. So, I keep on publishing, the web is good for that. I can almost afford to keep writing while paying the bills with a real job.

Everyone has their own unhappiness, I’ve picked mine. Not everyone can say that.

via Love and Noir in the Time of Ebooks « ASCII by Jason Scott.

Do you Speak Esperanto?

I first heard about Esperanto ten years ago when I was writing at a site called BackWash. One of the other writers was learning to speak the language and writing about it. I read some of the history, how the language was developed. I even wrote a post about Esperanto, as a resource for anyone else interested in finding out more. Then, I heard very little about it again, until finding this post today (see below). Esperanto is still around, still has all the potential to grow and become important… but it hasn’t yet.

Like its vastly more successful digital cousins — C++, HTML, Python — Esperanto is an artificial language, designed to have perfectly regular grammar, with none of the messy exceptions of natural tongues. Out loud, all that regularity creates strange cadences, like someone speaking Italian slowly while chewing gum. William Auld, the Modernist Scottish poet who wrote his greatest work in Esperanto, was nominated for the Nobel Prize multiple times, but never won. But it is supremely easy to learn, like a puzzle piece formed to fit into the human brain.

Invented at the end of the 19th century, in many ways it presaged the early online society that the web would bring to life at the end of the 20th. It’s only ever been spoken by an assortment of fans and true believers spread across the globe, but to speak Esperanto is to become an automatic citizen in the most welcoming non-nation on Earth.

Source: How an artificial language from 1887 is finding new life online | The Verge

About the Versatile Blogger Award

I see this award on different sites but didn’t follow up to see what it was about. It doesn’t link to another site to just click and find out. Today I looked it up and found the source. So now you know (and so do I).
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versatileblogger111

versatile-blogger-award

When you consider nominating a fellow blogger for the Versatile Blogger Award, consider the quality of the writing, the uniqueness of the subjects covered, the level of love displayed in the words on the virtual page. Or, of course, the quality of the photographs and the level of love displayed in the taking of them.

Honor those bloggers who bring something special to your life whether every day or only now and then.

Source: About the VBA | Versatile Blogger Award

Discover Your Personality Type & Write Better

The INFP Writing Personality: Elegant Persuasion

INFPs have a natural aptitude for writing. In exploring this solitary pursuit, you can communicate your deeply held values and experiment with elegant, inventive uses of language. INFPs write best when their imagination is unfettered.

Writing Process of the INFP

INFP Writers:

Work best in a quiet environment where they won’t be interrupted. They like autonomy so they can perfect their writing according to their own high standards.

Prefer writing about personal topics. You may lose your creative drive if the subject isn’t meaningful to you. If so, try taking an angle that allows you to write about your feelings on the topic. Look for ways to connect with readers by anticipating and meeting their needs.

Have a keen insight into the nature of things. Their prose often conveys startling images of mood or atmosphere rather than objects. They enjoy complexity and can patiently unravel dense material. They are able to see many sides of an argument and so may have difficulty reaching a conclusion. During the writing process, they may often pause to consider alternatives or to seek connections between seemingly disparate things.

Potential Blind Spots of the INFP

INFPs may:

Strive for elegance in language and may want to polish the work too soon. INFPs tend to write long, meandering first drafts, so you’ll likely need to synthesize and cut material later. Save the search for that perfect metaphor until the revision stage.

Write in purely abstract terms. INFPs communicate their values and personal vision through their writing. They search for the meaning behind the facts, and so may consider the facts themselves to be of marginal importance. This is not true, however, for most of your readers. During revision, add concrete details. Appeal to the five senses. Include statistics. Incorporate other points of view for balance. Make sure your research backs up your conclusions.

Tend to be sensitive to criticism. Nevertheless, consider showing your work to a trusted friend or colleague before you begin the final draft. This feedback may be especially helpful in focusing your work and ensuring that it includes enough facts to sway your audience to your position.

via Discover Your Personality Type & Write Better Content For Your Website.

If you’ve read this site awhile do you think this describes the way I write?

I do. However, there is the danger of perception. Reading horoscopes/ predictions should be a communications science.

Use caution when reading predictions and forecasts. I think you need to read them as a skeptic not a full believer, especially when you want to believe what you read.

The Dangers of Sitting

Sitting requires a person to remain in one place. This can be dangerous for health and safety reasons.

Standing allows for quicker reactions. People already standing can jump, dash or run that much sooner than someone who starts from a seated position. When action is needed sitting down isn’t a great option.

Musical chairs is a game where sitting is dangerous. Players compete for the dwindling number of chairs each time the music stops. Falling out of a chair, being pushed from a chair, or not getting a seat at all, keeps the game challenging. Even getting a chair doesn’t keep you from having someone attempt to sit on you.

There are health reasons to avoid sitting too. Long periods of being seated can cause poor circulation. Break up sitting time with light exercise. Stand up, stretch and walk in place for five minutes. Just five minutes will be enough to bring circulation back to your limbs.

Consider going back to bed for a nap as a better alternative to the dangers of sitting.

Written as a writing test for a website. Posted here as a quick and easy way to get the word count and spellcheck at the same time. What would you write on the topic “The Dangers of Sitting” with 250 words, or less?

I’d Pick Viking

Through a strange set of circumstances, you are being forced to spend the rest of your life as a… Spartan, Viking, Knight or Roman. Which do you choose? Why? What will your life be life? What’s daily life like? Would you enjoy it?

writing prompts — my 28 most tried and true writing prompts.

I’d pick Viking, mainly because they had a better attitude towards women. When people think of Spartans, knights, Vikings or Romans they tend to think of men, fighting men. But, most of the people living in those days were not men, or fighting men. What do you know about the ordinary lives of people in history? Most fiction is written from the perspective of people who had power and resources, not those who lived and died without making it into history books. The great unknown.

What Do You Write on a Postcard??

The first picture Postal Card was Sent as a Joke!

The Origin of the Modern Post Card

In 1840 the British author Thomas Hook made a post card with caricatures of postal workers on it. It was meant to amuse and irritate the workers as it went through the mail. I imagine it did, I am sure he got a lot of attention.

Hook didn’t send it out to anyone else, he addressed it to himself, so he could be sure of having a grin and a chuckle at the end of the process.

From – What Do You Write on a Postcard?

This post has suggestions from humour to writing a mini journal. All good ideas. What do you tend to write on a postcard? Do you only send them when you’re travelling?

Postcards are also a nice way to give someone personal mail (a letter) without having to say a lot. Nice when you’re trying to be nice and send a personal note to someone you don’t know very well.

How would you write a postcard to a Great-Aunt you’ve never met?

Writing Prompts for Food Bloggers

Check the link to read the full list. The list included your foodie history, diets, ingredients, kitchen gadgets, where you would have dinner if you could choose from anywhere in the world and what makes a memorable meal. Of course, food loves and hates make the list too.

I liked the prompt about ingredients you’ve been afraid to try. There are so many interesting, exotic and unusual ingredients these days. I can remember when my Grandmother was afraid to cook corn on the cob. She had never seen it before (in the UK) and ended up leaving it to rot before she worked up the courage to cook it. I always thought that was silly when I was a kid. But, corn was pretty commonplace to me. I’ve since had a few things expire in my own fridge.

How do you feel about the word foodie?

Write down 10 of your favourite food words, and then make a sentence for each word. Turn each sentence into a blog post idea.

via 16 Writing Prompts for Food Bloggers | Food Bloggers of Canada.

 

I think it’s a great list. Many of the prompts could be adapted for other topics if you put some creativity into it.